Category Archives: Author Interview

Author Interview: ‘Across the Fourwinds’ by Shane Trusz and Darryl Frayne

The Maidstone Chronicles Book 1

About the Book:

Will Owens is an orphaned teenager with a unique ability that has alienated him in the quiet town of Cochrane: he can see dark creatures emerging from the Arden Forest. And people are dying.

Will is befriended by Morgan Finley, a stunning fencing champion whose dreams of a Yale scholarship are haunted by her family’s secrets. The unlikely friends venture into the Arden Forest where they enter a magical realm in the throes of a brutal war.

Entrusting their lives to a Callum Sage and his rogue companions, Will and Morgan embark on a perilous journey across the Fourwinds to face an ancient evil birthed in a tower known as the Maidstone.

Courage, faith, and friendship are tested at every turn, but the group has yet to realize the full extent of the powerful forces that threaten to destroy the Fourwinds and reach far beyond the town of Cochrane.

 

Add to Goodreads

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

Shane: My adventure into the world of writing began just as my life was coming to an end, or at least it seemed that way for a time. When I was 15, I was diagnosed with Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis. Overnight, I went from a typical teenager to being laid up in bed for weeks at a time in terrible pain.

I remember being rushed via air ambulance to Toronto and my Ante Linda had sent along a book for me, The Sword of Shannara, by Terry Brooks. I wasn’t a reader back then, but when I finally succumbed to the boredom (imagine being in a bed for weeks in a world before the Internet), I finally cracked the cover and my world was forever changed.

Darryl: When I was a child, I often thought of becoming either an actor or a writer. I’m intrigued by the possibility of being somebody different for a while, walking a mile in their shoes. Writing allows me the creative space to explore some of those possibilities.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Shane: I prefer to write late at night, tucked away with my laptop, headphones on.

Darryl: I like to be at my desk, as quiet as possible, any time of day.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Shane: The scenery and the history found in the backcountry and ancient ghost towns of British Columbia inspire me to no end. I also enjoy working in third world countries and meeting people whose lives are so fundamentally different than my own.

Darryl: The big picture ideas come from Shane! Smaller ideas for characters and scenes come from my own experience and interactions with people mixed with imagination.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Shane: Some people are analytical and need to outline heavily before they start writing. I’m the absolute opposite. If you’re like me, the worse thing you can do is overthink things. I like to sit down with a character in mind and cut ‘em loose. The more real a character is in my mind, the less work I need to do because they take on a life of their own.

Darryl: I don’t need a firm outline, but I prefer to know where the story is going. This helps me understand the characters and setting so I can try to keep things consistent and coherent.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

Young Adult Fantasy. Terry Brooks is the common bond that brought us together to collaborate on this fantasy series.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Will Owens – Ian Frayne

Morgan Finley – Bella Thorne

Rowe – Jack O’Connell

Bremer – Christian Bale

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

Shane: Terry Brooks, Stephen King, Patrick Rothfuss, Tom Clancy

Darryl: Terry Brooks, Patrick Rothfuss, Robert Jordan, Suzanne Collins, Michael J. Sullivan, JK Rowling, Kate DiCamillo

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

Shane: The High Druids Blade (Terry Brooks) Red (Sammy Hagar)

Darryl: The Rose and the Thorn (Michael J. Sullivan), On the Meldon Plain (Pam Brondos), Six of Crows (Leigh Bardugo)

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Shane: The first book that came to mind was The Stand by Stephen King. I love giant stories about the end of the world and the characters in this book were beyond memorable.

Darryl: That usually depends on when you ask me. Besides Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter, I consistently say it’s The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane (Kate DiCamillo). It’s a children’s novel, but it has so much heart and unbelievable adventure that I’m inspired every time I read it. And it’s really fun to read aloud.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Shane: Damn the rules and get at it.

Darryl: Don’t write because you want to become an author. Write because there’s no other activity that brings you such joy.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MaidstoneChronicles

Instagram: www.instagram.com/maidstone_chronicles

 

 

About the Authors:

Shane:

For as long as I can remember, I’ve had the soul of a gypsy. Having lived in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, and Haiti, I seem most comfortable when there’s change brewing on the horizon.

My adventure into the world of writing began just as my life was coming to an end, or at least it seemed that way for a time. When I was 15, I was diagnosed with Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis. Overnight, I went from a typical teenager with great parents, growing up in Cochrane- snowboarding, mountain biking, and playing any sport with a ball- to being laid up in bed for weeks at a time in terrible pain. Living in the deep north, we were 8 hours away from an MRI machine and for a while, things didn’t look so good as doctors struggled to figure out what was happening, and why. The pericarditis would come back a few times a year throughout my teenage years and for a while, I lost my way. I remember being rushed via air ambulance to Toronto and my Ante Linda had sent along a book for me, The Sword of Shannara, by Terry Brooks. I wasn’t a reader back then, and when I finally succumbed to the boredom (imagine being in a bed for weeks in a world before the Internet), I finally cracked the cover and my world was forever changed.

Life doesn’t always end up the way we think it should, but isn’t that part of the ride? Hard lessons are sometimes necessary to prepare us for the next big adventure as we journey towards leaving this world a little better off than when we arrived.

After finishing the original Shannara Trilogy, I started writing. I can’t remember when exactly I started, but I do remember having a plethora of ideas as I tended to do a lot of daydreaming, especially in school. I spent years writing books that will never see the light of day as I cut my teeth learning this new craft. To this day, if I don’t get my ideas down on paper regularly, I feel out-of-sorts.

My greatest challenge as a writer stemmed from the fact that I loved to write massive stories, and conversely, struggled to no end with the countless tiny details of flushing out something great. Shortly after moving back to Canada from Haiti, I reconnected with an old friend, Darryl Frayne. I knew Darryl was just about the complete opposite of me, in that he loves to mine the gems found beneath the extra words that don’t belong on the page. He works down in the weeds, pruning and clipping and shredding and planting and changing the paths as required to develop great story. The magic that unfolded was…well, I suppose you can be the judge.

In the in-betweens, I married my high school crush back in 1998. Joy has added all manner of color to my life and to this day, makes life an absolute thrill ride. When our son came along in 2004, well, I love viewing the world through his animated features and cannot wait to see how he is going to leave the world better off than when he arrived.

 

Darryl:

As far as I can remember, my journey into writing began when I was about 11 or 12 years old. I had always enjoyed stories, so I experimented with some comic-book style writing. I would draw my characters in small boxes, complete with talking bubbles for dialogue!

My favorite books growing up include The Wizard of Oz, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Lord of the Rings. As an adult, some of my favorite fiction writers include Terry Brooks, Patrick Rothfuss, and more recently, Michael J. Sullivan. I also have an affinity for YA stories with believable, endearing characters created by authors like J.K. Rowling, Kate DiCamillo, Rick Riordan, and Suzanne Collins. I could list so many others; there are far too many wonderful stories to read!

I am grateful for my timely meeting, subsequent friendship, and working relationship with Shane Trusz. He has a great gift for storytelling, conceiving grand adventures, and passionately spreading the word about our books. Although we are different in many ways, I am constantly surprised at—and thankful for—the way our gifts unite to form unique, enjoyable stories.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Author Interview, Reading Nook Blog Posts

Author Interview: ‘The Wealth of a Nation’ by T.B. O’Neill

About the Book:

This dystopian tale takes place when the jobs are gone — that is, except for an elite class of Workers. The story opens as Nathan Englander’s grandfather is jailed, and Nathan defends him in court. He soon begins to make connections about his grandfather’s past, while just down the street from his office, the city of Bakerton is building a Border Wall to separate Worker enclaves from Citizens. Protest is inevitable. The violence unexpected.

Thrust into the spotlight for his heroism at the Border Wall, Nathan prefers to keep his distance from the politicians, but is already on a trajectory to challenge political corruption and the shadow government exercising extra-constitutional power. He soon learns of an imminent terrorist attack, and may be able to prevent it, but not without placing those he loves in jeopardy. The culprits come from within. But from which side of the Border?

Awakening to the restrictive order of his city and nation, Nathan must nimbly negotiate between two power states, try to mend his city, and save those he loves. And he must face a larger question: In a place and time where the dependents of society are convinced that they are “privileged,” and the right to work or engage in commerce is severely constrained, here does one find dignity? And is anyone really free?

Add to Goodreads

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I’m 71. Always longed to write fiction. But as a practicing lawyer, I was writing constantly at work and had little energy for the avocation until I retired and started writing about 6 years ago.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I habitually go to the word processor each morning (between 6 and 7), after my coffee and email duty, and write for the next four to six hours. I have a study where I do my dirty work.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

I came from a working class family. The inception for the idea of this book came as I was sitting on the porch one evening, contemplating how technology, robotization, globalizing the work force (out of this country) and immigration, have each contributed, to ever diminishing employment opportunities for people who work with their hands. Most people in fact. I witnessed what happened to the lumber industry in the Northwest, and the garment industry in the east. Then I asked myself, what will happen when the jobs are gone? When only those with smarts and specialized educations can get decent pay; when tradesmen must compete with failed baccalaureates; and when speaking the King ’s English is required for even service jobs? What will happen to economic mobility? How will the government keep the peace, keep the rabble from rioting. Pay for it all? I sat down the next day and started to write, not knowing where it would take me.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I didn’t with the first four books I’ve written, although I am currently mapping out an outline for the prequel to this book, The Wealth of a Nation. The prequel will be entitled The Fall of a Nation, and the series will end with a sequel, The Rise of a Nation.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I’ve written two memoirs, one legal thriller, and this book, which reads like a thriller, but meets the criteria for classical dystopian fiction.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Can’t say.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I’ve always read a lot, although, personally I’m slow and careful as I read. For modern writers I love Cormac McCarthy best, but also John Irving and Pat Conway. More recently Hannah’s Nightingale, and especially Anthony Doerr’s All The Light We Cannot See, whose book set my mind ablaze. So I guess you’d say I like rhythmic writers, those who feel the language as they tell their story.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

We, the Russian classic; and The Handmaids Tale. Just finished Homo Deus, Ordinary Grace by William Krueger, and Fleet, by Brian Marshal.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Blood Meridian, by Cormac McCarthy. It is the great American Novel. The flow, the rhythm, the mood, like a symphony. A total immersion of sound and images and story that melt into a whole gut churning and mind emblazing experience.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

You can say you are a writer when: you do it steadily, love it more than a child, and have put in your 10,000 hours learning the craft.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

I’m working on this; no answer to date.

 

About the Author:

I admit I spent three decades practicing law.

But I would have rather been a writer. Trial work did allow me to fight the old battles of my youth (primarily against authority of any kind), and it provided a treasure trove of material that writers search for tirelessly. Courtroom work, if you do it right, is essentially story telling. Not just any story. It must ring true because In court emotions are tense, senses are acute. The result can be comic in its absurdity, or sad enough to make you weep. The stories juries hear can be full of hubris and defensive pride, or fearful, shy and pleading. Either way, they all churn your gut. And your adversaries at the bar can be insidiously cunning, though skilled in the art of deception. As often as not, the truth is hard to find. But these were my peers, my fellow lawyers, and sometimes me, who later came to populate my fiction.

So, it is not surprising that I use the law as a backdrop for my novels, and lawyers as characters to explore story lines where justice and the moral consequences of its execution are major themes. The protagonists in The Wealth of a Nation and Slugger are lawyers, and I require them to make hard choices. Whether in life or in fiction, one must be careful not to align oneself with the wrong faction.

I began this second career as a writer by accident, although in earnest, when my brother asked that I chronicle our family history. The result was a two-volume saga: A Mile Beyond, and Dangle Him Purposely. Each is a tale about my family. The first volume explores a family wracked by violence, alcoholism, ignorance, and chronic poverty. The second volume, taking place in the ’60s, concentrates on my generation’s loss of innocence during the Vietnam era, and my memory of the war. Both memoirs are essentially stories of well-earned guilt and redemption.

Now that gray is the predominant color of my hair and skin, and I’ve been able to see more clearly the follies of my past, I hope to impart the lessons of my youth. One upside is that reliving your past will scrub your soul clean, although it will never shine like it did in your youth.

For those who are curious: I love this avocation . . . writing. Getting up before dawn and discovering what is revealed on the blank page. I live with my wife, Beth, and my three-legged dog, Joe, in a Northern California walnut orchard with a view of the mountains. And I dream that someday my grandchildren will read the history of their family in my memoirs, and be strengthened by the mettle and resilience of their ancestors.

Leave a comment

Filed under Author Interview, Reading Nook Blog Posts

Author Interview: ‘Over Easy’ by Pam Rossi

 

About the Book:

For two decades Sunday morning in Detroit means great music on OVER EASY with Pam Rossi. Both national and local artists talk to Pam about their music, lives and new projects on Detroit’s favorite week end music show.

 

Add to Goodreads

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I have been a radio DJ/Voice Over Artist for nearly 30 years and I am an audio book narrator with 30 books currently on Audible .  My current book came about from my radio show of musical guests I had on to interview and play songs.  Many times listeners would ask how they could hear the interview again.  That got me thinking I should put them in a book and when the time was right, I did just that.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Anywhere quiet.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Life experiences.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I do have a non-fiction in my head. I have a plan as how it will be written, a basic outline. We’ll see how it goes.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

This current book is non-fiction. It is actual interviews transcribed with my written introductions to each section, rockers, blues, singer/songwriter, folk/americana and more, plus introductions to each artists chapter.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Does not apply

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I do not really have a favourite author.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

Mind Set by Carol Dweck

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Don’t have one.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

I never thought I would do a book. Writing was never on the radar, but then it happened.  You never know.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

I use Facebook mostly so you always find me there – www.facebook.com/pam.rossi

Website: www.pamrossi.com

Twitter: @PamRossi

 

About the Author:

Pam has been a radio disc jockey for over 30 years, mostly in the Metro Detroit area where she was born and raised. She has worked in many areas of the broadcasting field including on air personality, news/traffic, production, producing and as a music director. Pam has been the producer and host of the acclaimed Over Easy morning show on WCSX in Detroit since 1999.

She also works as a voice over artist specializing in educational and training videos, narrations, e-learning and telephony. Pam has narrated over 20 audio books on sale on Amazon and dreams of one day voicing a full length documentary film.

Pam’s film, television and internet show credits include Up In The Air and Out Of Sight with George Clooney, Demoted, Into the Storm, Detroit 187, UDetroit and DetroitMusicStation.com

She is also a co-author of her family’s historical cookbook, Breaking Bread, along with her six sisters.

The roller coaster ride of creating Over Easy Conversations stemmed from listener’s desire to go back and hear guest interviews again in conjunction with the ever evolving technology of radio broadcasting. It was also a way to preserve one of her favorite parts of radio, live guest interviews. This book allows readers to experience the conversations of the artists and Pam in an intimate setting and gives a glimpse into their personalities, experiences and stories.

Leave a comment

Filed under Author Interview, Reading Nook Blog Posts

Author Interview: ‘Afterdeath’ by Benoit Chartier

About the Book:

Death is a country we see through the tiny keyhole of an immovable door. Raised by their grandmother after their parents’ death, Chloe and Olivia Borders are now in mourning for Rose. The Alzheimer’s that forced them to be split into separate foster homes has taken their last living family member. As a way to rekindle their friendship, the twins commit to a road trip— which spells their demise. Now the question is: What comes after, and how will they get back to life?

 

Add to Goodreads

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I’m a French Canadian who shares his time between his home country and Japan, where my wife is from. I have two kids, one born there and one born here. I got into writing very young, when an author came to our school and it finally clicked that all the books in the library came from somewhere.  That week I wrote my first book. It was thirty pages long. I still have it.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Morning, at my computer in our room, when there’s no one in the house. I’ll drink green tea and plug away at the computer for four or five hours. I’m getting ready to leave for Japan again, so I’ll probably work on my new novel over there for a spell.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Out of the blue, mostly. They’re an amalgamation of everything I think about, and the new stimuli that comes knocking on my brain, out of nowhere. I once got the idea for the currency in the land of the dead from kids playing with pennies at a table a the restaurant.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I usually know the ending before I start the long slog. I changes sometimes, but I have a fairly solid stick in the sand to aim for.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I like to write cyberpunk, fantasy and paranormal (for now). I was heavily into fantasy as a kid (Piers Anthony, Tad Williams, Robert Asprin). My father was more of a sci-fi nerd, so I started picking up his books from his shelf. A lot of Isaac Asimov, if I remember correctly. Then I got into more newish stuff, Orson Scott Card, Isaac Asimov, Jeff Noon. I really like weird fiction at the moment, and my favorite publishing house is out of Toronto: Chizine Publications. I’ve found everything they publish is gold.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

In my latest, I would love to see up-and-coming young black actresses playing the twins. Maybe Fallon and Felisha King?  I can easily picture Morgan Freeman playing Toussaint, Idris Elba playing the Baron Dimanche, Sigourney Weaver as Larunda and Emma Watson as Angelina. Yeah. That would kick ass.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I try to read as much as possible. Right now, my favorite authors are my friends who are breaking through in the writing world. People like Meghan Negrijn and Craig Munro. They’re the best. Otherwise, I very much enjoy William Gibson, Robert Shearman, Helen Marshall and Neil Gaiman.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

The Bones of the Past, by Craig Munro

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Sure, make me pick my favorite child. Okay, let me tell you about my favorite-book-as-artifact. It’s called “S.”. It is the most wonderful thing I’ve ever encountered in the literary world. Let me tell you about it. It comes in a box, so you can’t see what it looks like. It was written as a collaboration between J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst. When I got it, I had no idea what I was getting into. I asked for it for Christmas. So I open the box, and inside, is a book that looks like it was printed in the 1950s. The book itself is an artifact. It’s made to look as if it’s a library book that’s been borrowed for years. There are stamps at the back, it has the Dewey Decimal sticker on the spine; the whole nine yards. The book itself says that it is called “The Ship of Theseus”, written by V.M. Straka. Inside the book, you will find, written in the margins, conversations between two people, for the duration of the book. Back and forth, back and forth, written in different penmanship and color, (making it easier to identify the writers). These two are a man and a woman who go to the same College. The man was kicked out, and sneaks back in sometimes to study the book. The woman is a student trying to figure out her life, who also likes Straka (as an author). Now, there is a mystery surrounding this book, and who the author is. The “original” story was written in German, and so there is a translator who leaves footnotes. The two readers discover more and more about the book, and a very present danger by secret societies still extant, and must figure out together what’s going on. Throughout the book itself, which, on its own, is beautifully written, there are clues. The translator points to them, and eventually the reader must figure them out him or herself. As well, the two leave each other little odds and ends inside the book (pictures, postcards, napkins with hidden messages, little newspaper clippings, obituaries, etc.), which add to the authenticity of the thing. You’ll never find this book in a library, just because of the bits of memorabilia that will get lost. It is the most wonderful little jewel, and the most complicated, that I’ve ever had the pleasure of wrapping my head around.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Read a lot, write until the thing is finished. Take the criticism. Improve. Learn. You’ll make it.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

Website: www.trode.ca

Facebook: www.facebook.com/calumnist

Twitter: @chartier_benoit

YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCfopDTGimofA7OAXoyu69zA

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/7030391.Benoit_Chartier

 

About the Author:

Benoit Chartier is a Science Fiction, Fantasy and Paranormal author who also does a podcast called Adventure In Your Ear and writes a philosophy blog. He lives in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada with his wife and two sons. He shares his time between Canada and Japan.

Leave a comment

Filed under Author Interview, Reading Nook Blog Posts

Author Interview: ‘The Sons of Summer’ by Michael Dault

 

About the Book:

The Dalton family moves to the mining town of Rupland, where baseball is that of a religion. The surrounding counties help make up the storied “Summer League,” where the best baseball in the country is played. In Rupland, little boys dream of donning the orange and black of their idols, the Rupland Hawks.Jack— the leader, Johnny— the rebel, and Joe— the student, are sons of a tormented Vietnam veteran who pushes them towards a better future. Together they battle through Rupland’s and their own hardships of death, decline, and war that tears them apart. The Dalton boys follow different paths in life that change the course of their family, friends, and town forever.

The Sons of Summer tells the story of family, baseball and the American dream’s glory and demise in this last gasp of a small town.

 

Add to Goodreads

 

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I was raised in a small town in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I graduated high school with a class of 13 students, including myself. There weren’t any opportunities where I grew up, unless you wanted to be a miner or work in the woods, so I pursued my first love of baseball. I went far, but wasn’t good enough to make any real money doing it.

I was always interested in filmmaking and did it when I was in junior high, so I transitioned into that, learning what I could. Any set or project I could be on, I’d attach myself to. I learned the business from the ground up, learning and understanding every job on set. Eventually, I started making my own stuff. I just loved writing screenplays and seeing them mold into a story on a screen. So I pursued that.

For a day job, I started out in radio as a weekend deejay and then just worked my way up the media ladder. I worked for newspapers and magazines and online platforms as a sports writer. Even did broadcast journalism for several television stations as a writer, editor, and producer.

Even before I could read and write as a child, I was fascinated with storytelling. My father was always a good storyteller. He always told my siblings and myself many stories, great stories, of world/American history, his own life experiences, people he knew, etc. We just ate it up, you know? He always said to me “write what you know”, so that’s what I do. Anything I’ve experienced in my own life I try to transition into my writing somehow.

2: Do you have a favorite time and place where you write?

Not really. I’ve written everywhere from in coffee shops to in a car, even on a baseball field. I just write when I feel inspired. I keep notes with me all the time. Used to be post-its or napkins, but now I keep notes on my phone. I’ll come up with some cool dialogue or if I heard something that sounded good, I try to remember it. And there are those times when you have got to just be proactive and push through, and actively find inspiration. I do that a lot as well.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Personal experiences and stories from where I grew up, whether that be mine, my families or the area I was raised in general. As I said, I come from a film background, so when I write characters, this sounds so douchey, but I like to embody that character. What would they say or how would they talk? How would they feel or act in certain scenarios?   What would their motivations be? Things like that really. I act out the characters and just build from there. And as I write, I can just keep the flow going. If it reads well, I’ll go with it. And if it sounds like shit later on when I read it, then I revise, revise, revise!

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Depends on the story. For The Sons of Summer, I always kind of knew where I wanted it to go, but over the years the general story changed as I grew older and my writing matured.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

This is my first book and while it’s a fiction drama and sports, it has a lot of action in it as well. The next book I’m writing is along the lines of a historical fiction. In the case of The Sons of Summer, much of what you read was inspired by true events that happened, whether that be from my or my family’s own personal experiences or things I’ve read about or was around.

Baseball means a lot to my family, so I drew from the sport itself, and my background with it, as well as the strong military roots of my family. Then I kind of blended them all together.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Well, originally it was supposed to be a feature film. So right off the bat, I’d say Donald Sutherland as the narrator. He was originally cast. As for the others, hmmm, that’s a tough one. I’d like to see Tim McGraw because I based star pitcher Charlie Hylman off his father Tug McGraw who played for the Mets in the 60s and 70s. Maybe Dennis Quaid, Marton Csokas or Jeffrey Dean Morgan as the father James Dalton. As for the others, no-names would probably work best, so not to take away from the characters themselves.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favorite authors?

I do. My top five, in no specific order, are Cormack McCarthy, Matthew Bondurant, Michael L. Lewis, Jack Kerouac and Buzz Bissinger.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I just finished Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell. And I just started Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream by Buzz Bissinger. I’ve read many of his works after this one, which is arguably his best one. But I enjoyed the series and the film so much that I was always afraid to read the book they were based on. I didn’t want the book to ruin my perception of them, you know?

Kind of like if you watched the show The Walking Dead and then read the comics it was based on. The comics are noticeably different, and have bummed out people who watched the show, wishing they added certain elements or storylines that were omitted. I’m really sinking my teeth into this book, though. Glad I did!

9: What is your favorite book and why?

I have many, but if I had to choose one I’d say Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. It’s just brutal, man. The way he paints the imagery through his words is absolutely amazing. You don’t root for anyone in the story, because they’re all troubled. Bad shit happens all the time.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Don’t be afraid of rejection. Whether that be from critics who’ve read your work or rejections from publishing houses or studios or whatever. Everyone fears failure to some extent. But if you really sit back and look at the whole picture, failure can be an incredibly useful tool. It builds character. It can teach us how to overcome our shortcomings or mature our skill set. Sometimes failure is a beautiful thing.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

Website: www.tiptoepicturesinc.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/thesonsofsummer

Instagram: www.instagram.com/michaeljdault

 

About the Author:

Michael Dault was born in Norfolk, Virginia, and raised in the beauty of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in a small town called Republic. A former sports writer and one-time professional baseball prospect, he currently owns and operates his own film/television production company TipToe Pictures. The Sons of Summer is Mr. Dault s debut novel.

Leave a comment

Filed under Author Interview, Reading Nook Blog Posts