Tag Archives: Fiction

Author Interview: ‘The Tenant’s Wrath’ by Gabriel Nombo

About the Book:

Tenancy is a stage that is exercised by almost everyone, especially when we are obliged to shift from one place to another. However, this aspect has several challenges as long as we realize the relationship between tenants and landlords. Now, some remarks on it. Please, allow the author to entertain you while explaining the challenges witnessed in some tenancies.

THE TENANT’S WRATH (previously published as Outrageous Humans on Exoplanet) is a novel that has been written according to the author’s experience in living as a tenant in local houses. At the time of publishing this book, he has an experience of fourteen tenancies in local houses. There are troublesome tenants and house owners in some tenancies. How this report is presented? Through appreciating efforts that are done in space technology and exoplanetology.

Technology has drastically developed nowadays and, keeps on advancing rapidly. This has not left behind exoplanetology and space technology (let’s appreciate how curiosity rover was positioned on mars). Presently, we are able to live outside our customized planet for several months. Due to it, we know the biological impact of lacking the earth’s gravitational force. For instance, cardiovascular behavior of the human body when it’s in a weightlessness environment.

The report on how landlords and tenants live together, is assumed to be written in 34th Century, one century after the first signal indicating aliens’ presence is detected. A fictional reporter from the earth, writes it after voyaging to aliens ‘exoplanet. This exoplanet has aliens who are very angry by nature.

The reporter does a thorough research on aliens’ culture including their science, daily life, food style, theology, landlord-tenant relationship, education system, and others. Then, he writes a report which he forwards it to his fellow earthlings. It takes only a month for the emailed report to reach planet earth.

Welcome to a strange and fascinating exoplanet!

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

The challenges I faced when I was renting in several local houses have impressed me to write something to share with others. I started tenancy life soon after completing my high level education in March 2005. I tenanted in two local houses in Songea district, Ruvuma-Tanzania before shifting to Dar es salaam in November 2005. In Dar es salaam, I was lucky enough to live in the same building with four local landlords while studying at the institute of Finance management (IFM), taking information technology (IT).

I completed my college education in July 2008 and I got a job that moved me to Mwanza region (Tanzania) in October 2008. I tenanted in three local houses in this region while living in the same building with my landlords/landladies.   Thus, sharing items like a courtyard, bathroom, veranda, toilet, electricity, water utility, etc.

From my first tenancy in Songea up to my ninth tenancy in Mwanza, I realized that no tenancy was without a challenge. Hence, in January 2010, I started to construct my building and shifted into it in June 2010. My mind calmed in this hut and a distinguished guest arrived in my mind: an idea of documenting the challenges I faced.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I don’t have any specific time and place for writing. When I remember something, I might use my laptop or even my mobile phone to write what comes in my mind at that time. However, when I desire to put it in a paragraph, I usually write when my computer is connected to Internet.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

As far as ‘The Tenant’s Wrath’ is concerned, most of my ideas just came from events that I had already witnessed. I got a few events from other tenants after I published and printed part of this book in January 2012, which was in Kiswahili. With an exception of it’s setting (far away from the earth), I can say, I did not write this book. I just transferred it from brain storage to ‘written’ storage.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

There was no plan in writing The Tenant’s Wrath. The entire story already existed in my head before I started writing it.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

At the moment, I have only one completed book: The Tenant’s Wrath. Its genre is science fiction. I chose this genre so as to write it freely. As it involves a true part of my life, I wanted to make a reader know the life of characters in the book and not the life of author and his surroundings. Thus, until I expose a key, by reading only a novel, I think there is no direct relationship between the book and me. Example, Setifokasi (the protagonist) took accountancy at the college, but I took Information technology.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

I am not so familiar with the names of other famous actors out of Tanzania, but Vincent Kigosi (Tanzanian) would be the best fit to play the role of Setifokasi.

 7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read much, especially in digital form, not only books but also articles. I like novels that make me have knowledge I didn’t have before. A knowledge that is also funny and makes me laugh when I get it. In that way, I have several favourite authors, not limited to Tanzanian authors: Shaaban Robert with his book ‘Kusadikika (To be believed)’ and Irene Ndauka. Irene Ndauka has written several books in Kiswahili concerning witchcraft. The way she explains how science in the darkness operates, motivated me to desire explaining the opposite: how science in the lightness works.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

At the moment, I am reading Alien Attraction by Cara Bristol and Sub-human by David Simpson.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

My favourite book is Kusadikika (To be believed) by Shaaban Robert as it takes me to a strange environment where I can do tourism of its kind.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

If that someone were in front of me now, I would say; if you have a story that you think it is interesting and people can get entertained or learn something from it, writing it should be inevitable. Without fearing how many people may read the resulted book. For, it is easy to document your interest but convincing other people to be interested in what you are interested in is so challenging.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/HarvestingAnger4Benefit

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarvestingB

About the Author:

Gabriel P. Nombo is an information technology (IT) professional. He is the author who engaged himself in part of what he has written. While struggling to dwell in local houses, the author had tenanted in more than eight houses in different regions of his country, starting from 2005 to 2010. During all this time, he kept on observing and admiring domestic relationship between tenants and landlords when they occupy and dwell in the same building. In January 2012, he published only part of his entire personal finding: ‘HASIRA ZA MPANGAJI (The Tenant’s Wrath)’. This work had only 112 pages and it included only 500 printed copies. He employed it to extract some more data from other houses that never lucked him tenancy. How?. He presented it to some academicians, mostly, higher learning institutions in several regions. Most of them got interested and took a copy of it.

In those regions, as he was also sighted marketing the novel tête-à-tête around the streets, he presented it to local people who became emotional to the title and exposed a lot of challenges they were facing. Numerous claims were either tenants’ maltreatment or landlord’s harsh behavior. This advantaged him to harvest more data and information on what the society faces when dwelling as tenants and landlords. By harnessing this experience, and, as much effort is now focused towards space exploration, extraterrestrial intelligence and space technology, the author was eager to share his thoughts on it. How? By building curiosity on how aliens might behave, when they grade themselves as tenants and landlords. This curiosity and many others, drove him insane. There was no way to cure it but, coming up with Outrageous Humans on Exoplanet.

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Book Blitz: ‘Just A Little Bit’ by D.S. Pais

 

Title: Just a Little Bit

A Twist in a Taste of Destiny

Author: D.S. Pais

Genre: Short Stories / Fiction

 

About the Book:

Just a little bit is a collection of short stories illustrating the contribution of destiny towards life under unfavourable conditions. It speaks volumes about keeping up the hope under adverse situations, falling in love, facing tricky circumstances and  yet winning, expecting the unexpected, not having hopes and getting rewarded, losing it all and gaining back, unusual relationships and friendships that defy time, feelings unexpressed, braving it all and finding happiness, pain and forgiveness and unexpressed love and so much more. Even in adverse conditions where there isn’t any hope left, you can change destiny by simply trusting and directing your emotions towards what you firmly believe in. It also gives you an answer towards emotional attachment to a person and if we lose them, are there any possibilities of spending time with them after life. It deals with daily normal situations in life that destiny chooses to give a twist.

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

About the Author:

After completing her Masters in Engineering, D.S. Pais has been working in the IT industry. She is a born-dreamer, imagines a lot. She has been writing since young. D.S. Pais is a creative person who once worked as an actress in student films and TV series for a brief period, until she discovered that her passion was in writing.

She writes short stories, novellas, novels, poetry and self-help books, as she cannot put her thoughts anywhere else. When she is not working on a book, she too enjoys reading books from different authors, watches movies in her free time, loves travelling and routinely works out (Pilates). Many of her titles have appeared among the top 100 Amazon Best Sellers in their own section. Born and brought up in India, D.S. Pais has taken Singaporean Citizenship and currently resides in Singapore with her husband and two children.

 

Social Media Links:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/DSPais

Amazon: www.amazon.com/D.S.-Pais/e/B078GFBFCC

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Book Blitz: ‘Immaculate Conception’ by I.J. Miller

 

Title: Immaculate Conception

Author: I.J. Miller

Genre: Fiction

 

About the Book:

 

Two moms, Maddie and Al, wake up one cold morning in March in a run-down motel in Weehawken, NJ thinking they have finally found safety after a cross-country escape from their baby’s manipulative biological father. But they soon discover that the state’s top hostage negotiator–and his personal four-man SWAT team–surround their room.

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION takes you to the inner core of two unique women desperate to keep their baby at all costs and provide him with the secure, protected, happy childhood neither of them had. This well-crafted story takes you from the drama of the present, to the tragic scarring of childhood past, to the joyful connection the two make as adults, then back to the present and its emotional closure to this passionate journey of two partners seeking a peaceful life together as a family.

Maddie and Al show us how important it is to protect our children at all costs and how valiantly they’re willing to fight to overcome the deep-rooted effects of early abuse.

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Excerpt

MOTEL

“I’m less unhappy when I sleep,” mutters Al, so tired she’s barely able to form words as she collapses face first onto the motel bed.

Maddie, lying on the other bed, is tempted to say, you never sleep, but Al’s already passed out. Probably better this way. Any inkling of a challenge would lead to another one-sided argument that Maddie would surely lose. She is exhausted as well. She closes her eyes. She wishes she could sleep. But her pulse continues to race at highway speed, knowing that after a few hours rest they will finally be able to complete their cross-country trek and be safe amid the millions living in New York City.

From the east, the Hudson County Sheriff, followed by his deputy, in matching cars of blue and white, pull into the lone driveway of the motel parking lot. There are plenty of empty spaces, making it easier to avoid the giant potholes puddled from the rain. Only one guest vehicle, a muddy Honda CR-V with New Mexico plates, is in the lot, parked in front of number fifteen, the only room occupied at this early morning hour on a cold Tuesday in March.

The forty rooms horseshoe around this stretch of asphalt marked by faded lines. At the end of the lot is a lobby with a picture window. Behind the glass is a small neon sign, one missing the letter V, that flashes repeatedly the word ACANCY.

From the west, a New Jersey State Trooper arrives. All of the vehicles congregate in a cluster at the center of the parking lot. Each man behind the wheel is quite familiar with this motel near the last chance exit off 495, a final alternative before driving into the darkness of the Lincoln Tunnel and emerging into Manhattan. It’s a place that typically rents by the hour: drug dealers, pimps, prostitutes, and johns, guests who feel Weehawken, New Jersey is safer and less expensive.

Their orders are simply to wait for Nokenge, who’s driving the seventy-five miles from the state capital, accompanied by his personal four man SWAT team.

Their only concern is the two women behind the door to room fifteen.

And the baby.

About the Author:

I.J. MILLER has published six literary works of fiction. SEESAW was translated into German and Spanish and sold over 132,000 copies in the Bantam paperback. WHIPPED is available in English and German. Next came the short story collection SEX AND LOVE, and the novella CLIMBING THE STAIRS. The audio version of WUTHERING NIGHTS was nominated for an Audie Award in 2014. And in 2019, IMMACULATE CONCEPTION was published to rave reviews. Miller is also a screenwriter, with an MFA from the American Film Institute.

Visit I.J. at www.ijmiller.com/index.html

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Author Interview: ‘Dreamy House’ by Bill Stack

The house of their dreams turns into a family’s nightmare.

 

About the Book:

Soon after a family moves into a remodeled Craftsman house, the mother hears strange noise and sees apparitions. Neither the father nor daughter hear or see anything unusual. Meanwhile, the daughter struggles in her new school until a boy on the basketball team befriends her. The mother and father seek answers to support their positions and push each other apart. Over time, the parents fight more and more often while the daughter and boyfriend develop a strong friendship. Eventually the real answers become known.

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

 

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I’m a retired management consultant who has been writing nonfiction and journalism for decades. I dabbled in fiction when time allowed, and I dove in when I retired in 2015. My first novel, Fear Among Us, was inspired by the measles outbreak at Disneyland during 2014 and 2015.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I write any time of day, mostly in mornings. Always a morning person, my best concentration is before lunch. I reserve afternoons for tasks that don’t require creative thinking. Ideas pop into my head around the clock, and I write little notes to remember them. I write in my home office and review hard-copy drafts on my back patio in nature’s peacefulness.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Dreamy House was inspired by my late mother’s belief that she had seen her long deceased mother. Events from my childhood and characters I have known are woven through the story. Standing Firm, which is nearly finished, began with a real airline crash. The sole survivor died a week or so later, and I always imagined what might have happened if he had lived. Chain Smoker is modeled on murder mysteries, but it focuses on arson instead of murders.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I pretty much know every story from beginning to end before I start writing. I even write chapter outlines. I also add and remove material as my research dictates and the stories develop. I let my drafts rest for a while, work on other projects, and then resume writing with a fresh mind.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

My novels don’t fit neatly into a particular genre. Fear Among Us has political undertones. Dreamy House deals with psychology and personality disorders. Standing Firm, which is nearing completion, follows the altered life of a plane-crash survivor. Chain Smoker, which is also underway, is a crime/mystery about arson and fire investigators. Feral Cats, which has been on a back burner for a year or more, is a psychological thriller. I want my stories to differ from mainstreams while still being interesting to readers.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

If my novels were made into movies, I would like talented unknown actors to portray my characters. I don’t want viewers distracted by familiar faces.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read daily, mostly nonfiction. Favorite topics include science, politics, and history. Two good books were Constitutional Myths by Ray Raphael and The Women’s Hour by Elaine Weiss. My favorite fiction authors are John Grissom, Tom Clancy, John Steinbeck, F Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemmingway.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I recently finished The Oceans by Ellen Prager. It’s a fascinating study of compositions, currents, temperatures, and life forms in the world’s oceans.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

George Orwell’s 1984 has been a personal favorite since high school because of its political and psychological nature, his clear writing style, and the compelling story. I also liked The Cain Mutiny by Herman Wouk and The Rainmaker by John Grissom.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Always keep your readers in mind. Do your homework and research. Plan your work and work your plan. Persevere. Construct compelling stories, convincing characters, and inspiring dialogue. Be sure your grammar and punctuation are correct. Psyche yourself for criticism and setbacks. Most criticism can be converted to useful information for self-improvement. Treat every setback as a learning opportunity instead of a defeat.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

I’m on Facebook. Search for “Bill Stack Author.” I’m always busy, so I don’t spend much time tweeting or posting. In addition to writing, I’m involved in community activities, politics, and family. My days are always full.

 

About the Author:

Bill Stack is a retired management consultant. After decades of writing instructional manuals, technical reports, and self-help books, he began writing fiction a few years ago. His novels weave relevant facts around characters who face real challenges and achieve well-earned success. He enjoys creating the stories, researching the data, constructing the scenes, developing the characters and relationships, and sharpening the descriptions and dialogues. “When my stories are finished, I see my thoughts and imaginations brought to life. I especially appreciate feedback from my readers about how they like my plots, places, characters, and themes.”

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Author Interview: ‘Down in the Belly of the Whale’ by Kelley Kay Bowles

About the Book:

About friendships and family. For fans of LM Montgomery & Anne Shirley. Irrepressible, irresistible. Modern, classic.

Harper Southwood is a teenage girl who can sense when people will get sick—but so what? She can’t predict her best friend’s depression or her mother’s impending health crisis. Being helpful is all Harper ever wanted, but she feels helpless in the face of real adversity. Now, she’s got a chance to summon her courage and use her wits to fight for justice. Laugh and cry along with this cute, high-spirited teen in her astonishing journey of self-discovery, as she learns that compassion and internal strength are her real gifts, her true superpower.

What people are saying:

“Bowles . . . clearly understands the world of young adults. Her depiction of Harper—her anxieties and excitability; her inner and outer personas; her heightened sense of the importance of “now”—cannot fail to pull readers into a teen mindset. The story is increasingly dark, yet in the telling it neither wallows nor depresses. Harper is allowed strength in her vulnerability. For all her isolation, it is her empathy that makes her special. There is a message here but not one that is pushed beyond the pale. Bowles writes to engage and to confront yet always seemingly with the intent to uplift. The resulting novel, far from being a leaden treatise on teen suffering, spurns literary pretensions and strives instead to include Harper’s generation of young adults and give this group its due. Girls especially will relate, but there is room here for everyone. A sage, vivacious tale of people set apart and brought together.” —Kirkus Reviews (a Kirkus recommended review)

“Bowles’ writing is lively and fun, yet still grounded and full of depth. . . . This is a wonderful book that cleverly explores some powerful and painful emotions.” —Victor Catano, best-selling author of Tail & Trouble

“Tackles sensitive social issues with heartfelt emotion and tender wit. . . . Well-drawn characters and themes exploring the mysterious power of the unseen infuse this inventive, revelatory novel.” —Kathleen Gerard, author of the novels The Thing Is, In Transit, and Cold Comfort

“I have lived through a trauma similar to one described in this book, and Kelley handles it in a careful, tactful, and compas-sionate manner. She illustrates good role models for healthy families as well as a gentle treatment of dysfunctional ones. . . . dense with activity and drama, dealing with difficult topics that are on a teenager’s mind in a sensitive manner that includes a good dose of humor and healing.” —Laura H Kelly, author, contributor to the anthology, Things We Haven’t Said

“An enjoyable and captivating read.” —Brian S. Leon, author of Havoc Rising

“Sometimes funny, sometimes sad, sometimes hopeful, always true . . . Down in the Belly of the Whale is Ordinary People for a new generation.” —Jason Parent, author of What Hides Within and Seeing Evil

“Humorous and harrowing, romantic and revealing, and an honest true-to-life lesson about being a teenager in this most interesting of times. . . . definitely a must read.” —Shawn Clingman, English/drama teacher and director, Grand Junction High School.

“A fast-paced, yet heartfelt account of an average teenager whose life takes a series of sudden and unexpected turns. . . . Possibly the most important aspect of Down in the Belly of the Whale, are the messages that it conveys. Some of these messages are to be brave, even when you think you cannot be, that you belong even when you think you do not, that the person you thought you loved is not the right person for you, and that high school anatomy is as awful as I has I remember it.” —Timmie Quitugua, librarian

“This book literally had me crying. It was really good! . . . I would totally recommend this book!” —Erin B., teenaged reviewer and book blogger, NetGalley

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I was born in Salt Lake City, Utah (and in answer to your next question, no, I am not), but raised in a Western Colorado town called Grand Junction. Because I have MS and my body responds poorly to extremes in temperature (GJ gets really hot AND really cold), we moved to San Diego, The Finest City in America (it’s really called that!) and very temperate, in 2011. I have two sons—10 and 12 years old, and my husband is a high school teacher

I have always loved writing, the way words can be combined in so many ways to create so many feelings. Stories can go anywhere I want them to go. Unlike life, which is much harder to control. I’ve always liked messing around with words—stories for my Barbie dolls, captions for my yearbook—but I didn’t really start working on fictional stories and poems until my college creative writing class. I wrote a sci-fi story while listening to “Unforgiven” by Metallica (betcha didn’t know I was a Headbanger from way back), and my professor, Charles Clerc, thought it was good enough to enter it into an L. Ron Hubbard short story contest. I didn’t win, but the process of letting the story in the song inspire me to write a totally unrelated story was intoxicating.

I have loved writing since birth, practically. But I’ve only been writing to share since my first published short story—a horror story called “Wobegone” published in Crimson magazine in 2000. I’ve only been able to write full time since October of 2013.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I have a small “office”— AKA a chair—in the corner of my bedroom, complete with laptop and picture of my late father, bookseller extraordinaire. There is a schedule taped to the side of my dresser, laying out chunks of time for each writing project and each social media outlet. Seven days a week!

3: Where do your ideas come from?

I people-watch and eavesdrop. A lot.

In Death by Diploma, Emma was my college roommate and current friend, and Leslie is one of my closest friends and colleagues from Colorado. The other names are just random ones I pulled out of my…hat.

The storylines can come from anywhere, I guess—news, television, myths. I taught high school English and drama for twenty years, including mythology—one of my favorite classes to teach. You can get a lot of ideas from mythologies and fairy tales, plus it’s SO fun to tell those stories in the classroom.

POV is tough to decide. I experiment with it all the time—the Chalkboard Outlines series is third person attached, but the Foundation series (YA Paranormal) alters between first and third person. And the YA standalone Down in the Belly of the Whale is first person, present tense. I’ve never done second person—maybe that’ll be next!

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I am a total seat-of-my-pantser in that I am not organized at all. I wish I was. With the murder mysteries, I know the basics—who got killed (that happens in the prologue) and who killed them and why. All the other stuff I have to figure out as I go. For the YA, I start with the general idea of the character and what she or he wants the most and how I think they need to do to get it, and then…I go.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I write cozy murder mystery and young adult paranormal. I am obsessed with mysteries/thrillers in my reading, and…well…I taught English and Drama for like 20 years, and the high school world is very interesting, the voices, the issues, it’s a lot of fun trying to tap into that mindset in my writing. I think, when I’m finished with the Chalkboard Outlines cozy series I might try a paranormal mystery series. Or maybe a YA paranormal mystery series? Who knows what will happen? I have a narrative non-fiction book—humorous self-help memoir—I’m trying to get an agent for right now. Maybe I’ll go the David Sedaris route, only with chronic illness?

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

I’ve been TRYING to get Melissa Benoist (Supergirl)’s attention for the past couple of years because I think she’d make a perfect Emma. Leslie’s tough: Charlize Theron? (we are dreaming big, right?) For the YA book Belly I need good teenage actors for Harper and Cora, but I really don’t know any teenage actors—got any ideas? I would love Sandra Bullock or Jennifer Garner to play Isabelle. Uncle Pasta is also tough—Ricky Gervais is funny but he’s too old. Same with Eddie Izzard. Sheesh.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

To Kill a Mockingbird is a perfect book, in my opinion. But there are so many others—books inspire me because of the way the author turns a phrase, paints a picture or makes me hungry for the next moment. East of Eden. Cat’s Cradle. Something Wicked This Way Comes.

Harlan Coben is the one who inspired me to write a mystery—I wanted to write something where the reader laughed a lot and didn’t know how the book would end. Dean Koontz has always inspired me because I think he’s such a great storyteller. My friend Shawn told me once to read TickTock because the rapport between the two main characters sounded a lot like my voice as a writer. I read the book and was so flattered to have a comparison made like that! Stephen King is, also, in my mind a genius storyteller. 11-22-63 had so many moving parts to it and he made them all come together in this amazing machine. Plus I feel he’s a romantic and a feminist and an optimist—all wrapped up in this word package that can scare the bejesus out of you. Lee Child’s Jack Reacher series is a current favorite of mine—I wanna be like Jack. Seriously. He’s evolving in the series, I feel, in terms of ‘collateral damage.’ I don’t think Jack believes in that anymore, and the stories are reflecting that. I’d like to talk to Lee Child about this. 😊

I am obsessed with reading and wish I could do it more often. As it is I read whenever I’m the passenger in a car or right before my eyelids slam shut at night—mostly mysteries and thrillers, some YA and horror. Lately Frederik Backman and Liane Moriarity or for my book club we’re reading Angry Housewives Eating Bon Bons!

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I have to read Angry Housewives Eating Bonbons for my next book club, which I remember as funny and touching when I read it for my Colorado book club like 12 years ago, so we’ll see how it feels on the reread. I love Frederik Backman (A Man Called Ove), and he has a book box of three—I still haven’t read the Britt-Marie one. I’m re-reading Dean Koontz Fear Nothing because I just got it on sale on my kindle—that’s a great way to get books you want to re-read, by the way—watch for the sales! I’m waiting for the new Liane Moriarty (Nine Perfect Strangers) to come to me on the hold list at the library—it hasn’t been on sale and I can’t spend a fortune on books, although I’d like to!

9: What is your favourite book and why?

My all-time favorite is A Wrinkle in Time, but man, there are SO MANY other amazing and wonderful books out there. Don’t get me started—I might never stop. I think this book is my favorite because there’s so much to it—it’s YA, and Sci-fi, and mystery (where’s dad? Now, where’s Charles Wallace?) and philosophy and religion all rolled up into 200 pages. So, so good.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

I would just tell them never to give up, and never stop learning and trying new things. Also, and I cannot emphasize this enough: YOU HAVE TO READ. A LOT. People who tell me they want to write but don’t want to read are delusional and will never succeed. This is true, I believe, in any profession: the more you study and practice, the better you will get. The best musicians listen to all kinds of music and learn about the history of music, the best politicians study all types of governments and policies, and et cetera, et cetera. Hmph. I could rant about this for days. You also have to write, a lot, although I don’t ascribe to all of the people who say you have to write every day or this many words a day or X number of hours or whatever. You should figure out your own schedule and make sure it includes study and practice. Oh, and you absolutely have to work on a thick skin. Like, tortoise shell thick. There are always people who have nothing better to do than knock you down, and it takes a long time and many rejections to find your success, but if you take the ones who offer constructive ideas and help and use them, and throw the non-helpful douchebag ideas away, it’ll all help you get better.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

My website: www.kelleykaybowles.com

My Amazon author page: www.amazon.com/Kelley-Kay-Bowles/e/B00JJ9T7AC

My BookBub Pages: www.bookbub.com/profile/kelley-kay-bowles and

www.bookbub.com/authors/kelley-kaye

My Facebook Author pages: www.facebook.com/authorkelleykaye and

www.facebook.com/KelleyKayBowles

My Instagram page: www.instagram.com/kelkay1202

My YouTube channel:

www.youtube.com/channel/UCVlte3qfP3gTpHOwjNjqDqg

Holy Cow! That’s a lot.

About the Author:

Kelley Bowles Gusich writes young adult novels under the pen name Kelley Kay Bowles. Kelley taught high school English and drama for twenty years in Colorado and California, but a 1994 diagnosis of multiple sclerosis has (circuitously and finally) brought her to the life of writer and mother, both occupations she adores and dreamed about way back when she was making up stories revolving around her Barbie and Ken dolls. Her debut novel, cozy mystery Death by Diploma (pen name Kelley Kaye), was released by Red Adept Publishing on February 2016, and is first in her Chalkboard Outlines® series.

Kelley has two wonderful and funny sons and an amazing husband who cooks for her. She lives in Southern California.

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