Tag Archives: Historical Fiction

Book Blitz: ‘The Fountain’ by John A. Heldt

Title: The Fountain

Author: John A. Heldt

Genre: Historical Fiction, Time Travel, Suspense, Romance, Adventure

About the Book:

Portland, Oregon. In May 2022, the Carpenters are a sad lot. Bill, 81, has just buried his beloved wife. Paul, 75, has terminal lung cancer. Annie, 72, is a paraplegic with broken dreams. Childless and directionless, the siblings face an uncertain future in their childhood home.

Then Bill, a retired folklore professor, learns from a dying man that the legendary Fountain of Youth, his obsession for decades, may be more than a myth. He races to Mexico to find the truth.

Within weeks, the Carpenters, with nothing to lose, enter a mysterious cave and exit in July 1905 as healthy young adults. They begin new lives in Oakland, California, only vaguely aware of a devastating earthquake that will rock the San Francisco Bay Area on April 18, 1906.

In THE FOUNTAIN, the first book in the Second Chance trilogy, three siblings find opportunity, romance, and heartbreak as they make the most of a new lease on life.

Readers’ AdvisoryThe Fountain is the first novel in a family saga that spans several years. While some storylines are resolved, others are not. They are addressed in subsequent books.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

About the Author:

John A. Heldt is the author of more than twenty bestselling time travel novels. The former reference librarian and award-winning sportswriter has loved getting subjects and verbs to agree since writing book reports on baseball heroes in grade school. A graduate of the University of Oregon and the University of Iowa, Heldt is an avid fisherman, sports fan, home brewer, and reader of thrillers and historical fiction. When not sending contemporary characters to the not-so-distant past, he weighs in on literature and life at johnheldt.blogspot.com.

Social Media Links:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/johnaheldt

Twitter: @johnheldt

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Author Interview: ‘Jalopy’ by Wes Verde

About the Book:

New Jersey, 1928.

All her life, Etta Wozniak has toiled on her family’s small farm, located on the outskirts of a lake resort town. After losing her mother and siblings to one misfortune or another, life has fallen into a rut of drudgery and predictability. That is, until the day she discovers something in an unlikely place; an old car. Energized by the prospects of a world beyond the one she knows, she decides to make this her last summer on the farm. However, disaster is not through with Etta yet, and there will be consequences for her upcoming departure.

Art Adams, a recent college man, arrives in town for a family reunion. After years of moving from one city to another and avoiding conflict whenever it tries to find him, he becomes enamored with the lake. However, there is another reason for Art’s visit. He is to marry a woman he has never met before; an arrangement that was made on his behalf and without his knowledge. More comfortable around numbers and machines than people, Art is reluctant to confront his parents on the matter. But if he decides to do nothing, he risks losing who and what he has come to love.

In a small town of farmers and firemen, musicians and moonshiners, bossy parents and barn parties, two people will come to understand what they must give up in order to have the chance to build something new.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing? 

Honestly, I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t telling stories of some form or another. I discovered stop-motion photography when I was about 7 and filmed adventures with my Legos. Writing short stories started at about age 13. In college, I started making 3-panel comic strips; little snippets that I sent to my friends or the student newspaper. For a while, it was just stuff that I did in my spare time. Then, around 2019, I got serious about putting a novel into print.

The appeal of writing fiction, for me, is twofold. It’s a creative release that can go in any direction I want, which is far less restrictive than my typical day at work. I’m an engineer by trade and most of what I do is figuring out how to make a bunch of moving parts function cooperatively towards a particular task. While writing is a different beast in many ways, I will often go through a lot of the same steps as I would for a technical problem, but instead of nuts, bolts, and friction I’m working with characters, settings, and flow. Funnily enough, each book finds me doing quite a bit of math in trying to answer the question, “Hm… would that work?”

If that sounds odd, I can’t fault you.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write? 

Probably my most productive time to write is early in the morning, before my kids wake up. That’s about the only time I can hope for any kind of quiet in the house and drink my coffee in a seated position. On the other hands, that’s also when the cat seems most demanding for attention… so mixed bag. Besides that, I make a habit of keeping a notebook around so I can quickly jot down ideas as they come to me.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Around four years ago, I developed an interest in history. Specifically, the history and lore of my home state of New Jersey. I grew up hearing and reading about a variety of different suburban legends (based on varying degrees of fact) and started reading more about them. There’s a book series called Images of America that has been crucial in this regard.

For example, my first novel Jalopy was based on some of the Garden State’s various lake towns that were vacation destination in the 1920s. I had known this in an abstract way for a while, but in the books I actually saw the pictures of vacationers juxtaposed with full time residents. The latter were often people working on farms, looking haggard as they posed for a photo in the middle of — what was surely — an exhausting day. That got me wondering if there was ever a “city mouse/country mouse” moment between a vacationer and a local who got together and how they sorted out who had the better situation. From there, enough of these elements started coming together where I finally decided to put pencil to paper.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go? 

Yes, to both. Usually, the way this thing goes is that I come up with a dozen or so story beats and elements that sound interesting. Maybe also a character or two — or rather, cardboard cutouts that will later approximate characters. On the first pass, I try to figure out if / how these beats can work together, drop the ones that simply won’t, and then attempt to thread them together. Next pass gets some meat added to the characters — quirks and habits — and a vague notion of how they might react to the things that are happening in the story.

It’s around this time that I have to drop and / or change a couple more plot points to fit with the developing characters. That may include the ending, but in general I start with a rough idea and try to stick with it.

So all that… then repeat about a million times… and I end up with a first draft… which will probably change again by print.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre? 

From a personal interest in local events and lore, I have made my literary home in historical fiction with a particular focus on New Jersey during the Interwar Period. Certainly the 1920s were mostly given a pass by my formal education, but in my own research I found a wealth of material and real world stories that are worth knowing about. In New Jersey alone, we had several towns that were flooded to make reservoirs, Greystone Asylum and its rich history, the factory which became infamous for the tragic story of the Radium Girls, and at least 2 major explosions resulting from war effort support. I suppose after reading about all that, I just kind of fell into historical fiction as a natural fit for a genre.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book? 

That’s a toughie… If you’ll pardon my playing somewhat fast and loose with years: for Roy Orville, I’d go with Robert Downey Jr. The man has a type, and “flippant but charming scoundrel” sums it up for me. I could see (maybe a somewhat younger) Idris Elba for Urbane Ferris. And for Victoria Boystov I’d go with one Polly Walker, probably best known for her role in the HBO series Rome

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors? 

I love to read, but I don’t get much time for it. These days, I do most of my reading for my kids before bedtime. Right now, they are all about this series called Bat Kitty by Nick Bruel, which I can recommend to anyone with a cat — grownups included.

As for personal reading, I’m fond of Scott Lynch and Andy Weir. The Lies of Locke Lamora is a fine mix of the heist and fantasy genres with lovable scoundrels and a solid “buddy” plot at its heart. And I cannot help but marvel at a man who turned a series of blog entries — done in his spare time — that turned into a bestselling novel which turned into a movie which turned into a series of novels.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I’m currently working my way through The Institute by Stephen King, which my mother suggested for my TBR pile back in 2019. When I say “backlogged,” I mean it. The book has a lot going for it. If you enjoy the theme of government conspiracy, and mild paranormal elements, I would recommend checking it out. Caveat: I say this without having yet read the ending (Stephen King fans will know the struggle).

9: What is your favourite book and why? 

Another toughie… but in terms of re-readability, I have to say Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. On its face, it was just a fun story of adventure and magic, but on later read-throughs I started to appreciate the context of the framework story, and the elements of tragedy and mystery. Its use of realistic magic is also very engaging; well-described and restrained in its application. I could definitely recommend to fans of the fantasy genre who don’t mind an incomplete trilogy.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

There’s any number of pitfalls, money sinks, and mistakes to ensnare the unwary first-time author. Watch out for anyone promising you incredible sales, a way to launch your book to the bestseller list, or other accolades “for a nominal fee.” Just don’t skimp on your cover.

Perhaps most importantly, do it because you enjoy it. I don’t plan to get rich off this. I just like to tell stories.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

My website is probably the best way to see what I’m up to. I will usually post info and links about upcoming releases, blog tours, and other appearances there.

https://wesverde.com

About the Author:

Wes is an engineer by trade, a busybody by habit, and a lifelong Jersey boy.

Writing has been a hobby in one form or another since 2006 when he started drawing 3-panel comics. When he is not putting words down, he is picking them up; the “to-read” pile only seems to grow larger.

A fan of nature, he spends as much time outside as possible.

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Book Blitz: ‘Ask Not’ by Mary M. Schmidt

Title: Ask Not

Author: Mary M. Schmidt

Publisher: Lulu.com

Genre: Historical Fiction/Thriller

About the Book:

To Katie, her love for John F. Kennedy was her whole world, even though he never heard of her.  Anyone who harmed him would have to answer to her.  It would not be pleasant. And when someone does, her revenge would consume her spirit and drive her in madness to Dallas.  Will she succeed in destroying Oswald?

Ask Not.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

About the Author:

Mary M. Schmidt, also known as Lynx, is the author of Gemini Lynx, Persephone’s Song, Cat Lady, and Our Frail Disordered Lives. She is a hospice volunteer, which during the pandemic, means going to a lot of zoom meetings. (Every time I turn around, more zoom!) A lover of animals, Mary lives near Annapolis with her rescue cat, Gemma.

Social Media Links:

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/1196284.Mary_M_Schmidt

Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/pages/category/Writer/Mary-M-Schmidt-756593501152605

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Author Interview: ‘Worth Waiting For’ by Matilda Madison

About the Book:

Betrayed by his wife five years earlier, Edward Powell, the Earl of Canton is furious. Penelope Powell is out to hurt him once more. Only this time, he won’t stand for it and he intends to teach her a lesson for her wicked deeds.

Penelope is shocked to learn that her husband has come to Scotland to confront her, although not nearly as surprised as he is. For five long years, Penelope has kept a secret, a child, from Edward and knowing her husband, he won’t soon forgive her for such treachery.

Now reunited in London, Edward demands that Penelope be a perfect example of what a lady should be, while he extracts a more intimate revenge in the bedroom. Will Penelope be able to meet Edward’s demands? Or will she lose herself to him just as she did all those years ago?

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I’ve been writing for about fifteen years now and it’s started out as a sort of therapy for me. I would try to work out my issues vicariously through my characters. This led to dozens of stories and piles of notebooks. Eventually I realized that I was no longer writing to deal with my personal situations, but because I had fallen in love with the world I had built and the characters that had problems all their own. I love writing and as much as I can get frustrated with re-writes and submissions and all that jazz, I always find my way back to my stories.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I like to write in the early morning and late evening. I try to write at least 2,000 words a day which isn’t always achievable, but it’s easier for me to write while it’s dark out. If the sun is shining, I can get distracted, which is why I tend to write most of my stories during the winter months. 

3: Where do your ideas come from?

All over. I could be in a car, looking out a window and daydream up a story about a chase scene. I can see an old couple eating dinner at a restaurant and imagine an entire history about them. I have an over active imagination that would probably have gotten me into a bunch of trouble if I didn’t focus it towards my writing. I also think I love life so much that I want to live a thousand lives and so I dream up all sorts of situations. 

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I used to be a pantser, which is a term I just learned about actually. It means a writer who writes by the ‘seat of their pants’, meaning I used to just sit down with an idea and start. I had a lot of trouble finishing my stories like this though, so now I’ll write a synopsis first when I get an idea. If I like it after a day or so, I’ll write a chapter outline. If that sounds good, I’ll start to flesh out my character analysis and then I’ll get to writing. A little foundation work goes a long way for me.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

Historical romance! I’ve loved them for years, but was embarrassed about them for a long time. I started reading them when I was fourteen and listened, foolishly, to people who called them trashy and believed that I should be reading more important things. Of course, it didn’t stop me from buying them and they were a guilty pleasure for a long time. Ultimately though, it didn’t make sense that I was writing stories that didn’t emulate what I was reading. So, I wrote a few historical novellas and while I didn’t have much success with them, I adored them. I found it liberating to write historical romance and eventually I stopped caring what people would think and decided to embrace it. I haven’t looked back since.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Literally anyone Shonda Rimes wanted!

Honestly, I’ve always had a tough time imagining my characters because I often just dream up people. Edward is difficult to pin down but I will admit I thought a lot about Luke Evans while writing him. I think Penelope could be played by Sydney Sweeney from Euphoria.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read a lot. Mostly historical romance, but also practical nonfictions, like ‘Pastoral Song: A Farmer’s Journey’ by James Rebanks. So, it could be considered and odd pool of authors that I read.  My favorite author is a very obvious answer, the queen of historical romance, Lisa Kleypas.  While I’ve read hundreds of historical romance authors, her books are the gold standard for me and her writing style is unmatched in my opinion. She can create an atmosphere that is so well detailed that the scenes just appear in my head and I’m always left amazed after reading and re-reading her books.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I just finished ‘The Indifferent Stars Above’ by Daniel James Brown. It’s a historical nonfiction about the Donner party and it was both haunting and fascinating. Often times I’ll break my historical romance streaks with harrowing stories of human adventure. Historical accounts about shipwrecks, mountain climbing and wilderness survivals stories captivate me. I’m about to get back on the historical romance train though and I’m going to read ‘Angel in the Devil’s Arms’ by Julie Anne Long and I’m very excited about it!

9: What is your favourite book and why?

The hardest question in the world! My go to answer is ‘The Hobbit’, only because it was one of my first loves and I tend to read it once a year. Really though I have about a hundred favorite books and couldn’t begin to name them all.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

I think if you write, you are a writer, whether it’s poetry or children’s books or novellas or novels. But if you want to be successful at it, I think you have to write a little every day. No one wakes up, having never written a day in their life with a brilliant story, writes one draft and becomes a success. It’s a craft and needs to be practiced and the more your practice the better you get which always makes me wildly happy after I finish a manuscript. Because I know it was better then my last and I know my next one will be better still.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

I’m on most social media sites and I check all of them fairly regularly. I’m not terribly hard to find, a Google search should do it, but here are my Website, Twitter and Instagram.

Website: www.matildamadison.com

Twitter: @madison_books

Instagram: www.instagram.com/matildamadisonbooks

About the Author:

Matilda Madison aka Melinda Michaels lives in Pennsylvania. A lover of history, she finds an immense amount of joy in knowing useless facts, exploring historical places and drinking copious amounts of tea. When she’s not writing she can be found researching obscured time periods for her books or her own amusement, refurbishing old furniture and baking.

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Author Interview: ‘Out Front the Following Sea’ by Leah Angstman

About the Book:

Out Front the Following Sea is a historical epic of one woman’s survival in a time when the wilderness is still wild, heresy is publicly punishable, and being independent is worse than scorned–it is a death sentence. At the onset of King William’s War between French and English settlers in 1689 New England, Ruth Miner is accused of witchcraft for the murder of her parents and must flee the brutality of her town. She stows away on the ship of the only other person who knows her innocence: an audacious sailor–Owen–bound to her by years of attraction, friendship, and shared secrets. But when Owen’s French ancestry finds him at odds with a violent English commander, the turmoil becomes life-or-death for the sailor, the headstrong Ruth, and the cast of Quakers, Pequot Indians, soldiers, highwaymen, and townsfolk dragged into the fray. Now Ruth must choose between sending Owen to the gallows or keeping her own neck from the noose.

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Purchase Links:

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Reviews:

“From the squalor, prejudice, and violence of 17th-century America, Leah Angstman has summoned to life the most extraordinary young woman. Ruth Miner insists on surviving, building a life, and being true to her odd independent self, despite the whole world seeing her as worthless filth. Angstman creates a hypnotically real and brutal world and then manages to infuse it with humor and beauty and a moving tale of love. The reader will follow Ruth Miner anywhere, and be the richer for it.” —Heather O’Neill, author of The Lonely Hearts Hotel, Lullabies for Little Criminals, The Girl Who Was Saturday Night, and Daydreams of Angels

“Lapidary in its research and lively in its voice, Out Front the Following Sea by Leah Angstman is a rollicking story, racing along with wind in its sails. Though her tale unfolds hundreds of years in America’s past, Ruth Miner is the kind of high-spirited heroine whose high adventures haul you in and hold you fast.” —Kathleen Rooney, author of Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk and Cher Ami and Major Whittlesey

“Rich in deeply researched detail, and peopled by complex characters, Out Front the Following Sea is a fascinating story that is bound to entrance readers of historical fiction.” —Kathleen Grissom, author of The Kitchen House and Glory Over Everything

“Out Front the Following Sea is a fascinating book, the kind of historical novel that evokes its time and place so vividly that the effect is just shy of hallucinogenic. I enjoyed it immensely.” —Scott Phillips, author of The Ice Harvest, The Walkaway, Cottonwood, Hop Alley, The Adjustment, and Rake

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you into writing?

It never seems like there’s much about me to tell, but I can start by stating the obvious: I’m the founder and editor-in-chief of Alternating Current Press and The Coil magazine and the author of Out Front the Following Sea, my debut novel of a brutal seventeenth-century set against the backdrop of King William’s War. I love Broadway musicals, Bruce Springsteen, my German Shepherd, quirky and terrifying history stories, living-history war reenactments, myth-busting, watching old episodes of Unsolved Mysteries, and making elaborate spreadsheets that I’ll end up only using once.

The initial thing that got me into writing was the shocking death of my best friend in high school, followed by the zine culture that surrounded the punk scene I was part of. Copying and pasting together zines and chapbooks was all the rage in my teen years, most of which were inspired by revolutionary calls to action from a bunch of pre-adults who had big dreams about changing the world, but didn’t have a clue how actually to do it. When I lost my best friend, I turned insufferable to the human world, and the only thing that could tolerate me was a notebook and pen.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

My favorite time to write is the very early morning, usually around 5 a.m. I’m most alive between 3 and 7 a.m., cup of coffee, huge picture window watching magnificent Colorado sunrises peeking over the Rockies. The house is quiet with no one else awake yet, not even the dog. That’s my time. Once we hit 8 or 9 a.m., the whole world seems to want a piece of me, and my personal creative time is over—time to be creative for everyone else.

My place is all over the place. I bounce between three couches, a standing desk, the kitchen table, two sitting desks, my outside patio table, pacing around the house, snuggled with my dog on the floor. I can never sit still for too long.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

The majority of my ideas are accidents. They come from some random sidebar tidbit that I happen to see or hear during research for something else. A lot of times I get curious about something I see in my Smithsonian or The Journal of the American Revolution email newsletters, or hear as an aside to some other story in an audiobook. I tend to be a Wikipedia rabbitholer and will click excessive links until I end up entirely somewhere else, arriving at some other conclusion, drinking the shrinking potion, following white rabbits. I cling to tidbits. I find something tiny, quirky, obscure that sparks my attention, and I stretch it into a whole story, a whole world.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I’ve done both. For longer stories (novels, novellas), I usually have an idea of beginning, middle, end, and then I let the research I find fill in the rest of the surrounding conflicts. For one novel I’m writing, I discovered through real-life letters that there is a terrible drought going on during the timeline of the book, so that real-life historical drought became a central conflict to the story that I hadn’t initially planned on. Usually, I can only fully visualize very short things—like snippets of flash—while longer works unfold slowly sentence by sentence or chapter by chapter. I do take long pauses, though, sometimes weeks or months, in between “scenes” to assess what I think the next scene or conflict should be before I start writing it. That helps me keep a tidy word count and plot goal per chapter.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

All of my writing is historical, though highly literary and uncommercial. Generally historical fiction, but I also write historical nonfiction and historical poetry, as well. I was raised a history nerd by a biography-devouring father, but I knew that scholarly nonfiction was never going to be my calling—I loved poetry too much. I loved heady language and the sound of purple prose and the songs found in colorful details. I wanted to tell stories, not just narratives. But I have no interest in contemporary themes, so my stories had to be historical, or they’d end up on the cutting-room floor.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

After watching Dune, I’ll go with Timothée Chalamet to play Owen, but he’ll have to beef up a little bit. Owen is pretty tough, even if he is French (zing!). I’ll stick with my dream gal of Sophia Lillis to play Ruth. Sam has to be rather imposing, so maybe Tom Hardy? Gerard Butler? Jeremy Renner? Chris Evans?—of course, if Sam is too handsome, then we might end up with an entirely different story on our hands, so maybe not Chris Evans. For Askook, I’d go with Tatanka Means, and for Machk, I’d love David Midthunder, but my only golden rule would be: All the Pequot have to be portrayed by actual Native American actors. I’d be pretty heartsick if someone whitewashed the Native characters, who are so crucial to the story and whom we’ve already whitewashed enough in this country.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read constantly. I have stacks and stacks of documents and books to get through, and I buy every book that looks good, even if I never end up reading it for lack of time. I’m also a huge audiobook junkie, and I get through an average audiobook in two days while walking my dog.

My favorite authors are Jack London, James Clavell, Elizabeth George Speare, Michael Chabon, Heather O’Neill, Kaitlyn Greenidge, Alexander Chee, Kathleen Rooney, oh my goodness, the list is endless.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

On audiobook, I just finished Ashes of Glory: Richmond at War by Ernest B. Furgurson, which was a pretty solid read, and started Living the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon by Suzanne M. Desan, part of the Great Courses series. In print, I just finished Shaindel Beers’ Secure Your Own Mask, which is a great collection of poetry, and picked up The Predatory Animal Ball by Jennifer Fliss, an advance reader copy I received in the mail this morning. My Kindle is currently in the middle of The Women of Chateau Lafayette by Stephanie Dray; she’s always an enjoyable read.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Oooooh, this answer fluctuates by the day. Today it’s My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier because I recently picked it up again, so it’s fresh in my mind, and I’d forgotten how tremendous it truly was. Brutal and raw, it’s an excellent look through a young boy’s eyes at the gray-area conflicts of the American Revolution. It’s been a favorite for my whole life, and when I was a kid, it was the first time I really learned what a Tory was and that there were as many conflicts between sectors of Americans themselves as there were between Americans and British. I always loved how it didn’t shy away from anything ugly—from the “n” word to graphic death scenes, it’s been on every banned-book list since 1974.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Besides “don’t,” lol? I’d say my best advice is to ignore people who say “write what you know,” and instead, you should write what you want to know. Write what intrigues you and will make you dig deeper to research it. In this way, you can teach others while continuing to learn new things yourself. My other piece of advice is simply: take your time. A good book takes years to write, not days.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

My website is at leahangstman.com, and you can find me as @leahangstman on Twitter, Goodreads, Instagram, Patreon, Medium, Ello, and Pinterest, and as @authorleahangstman on Facebook.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/authorleahangstman

Twitter: @leahangstman

Instagram: ww.instagram.com/leahangstman

Pinterest: www.pinterest.co.uk/leahangstman

Patreon: www.patreon.com/leahangstman

Medium: www.medium.com/@LeahAngstman

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/2980625.Leah_Angstman

About the Author:

Leah Angstman is a historian and transplanted Michigander living in Boulder. OUT FRONT THE FOLLOWING SEA, her debut novel of King William’s War in 17th-century New England, is forthcoming from Regal House in January 2022. Her writing has been a finalist for the Saluda River Prize, Cowles Book Prize, Able Muse Book Award, Bevel Summers Fiction Prize, and Chaucer Book Award, and has appeared in Publishers Weekly, L.A. Review of Books, Nashville Review, Slice, and elsewhere. She serves as editor-in-chief for Alternating Current and The Coil magazine and copyeditor for Underscore News, which has included editing partnerships with ProPublica. She is an appointed vice chair of a Colorado historical commission and liaison to a Colorado historic preservation committee.

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