Tag Archives: Short Stories

Author Interview: ‘Escape Reality’ by Jasmine Gorton

About the Book:

Everyone is looking for a way to escape reality. Why not jump into someone else’s shoes for a change?

Fall into a world of wonder as it feels like you are standing right beside the character. From sprinting away from hoards of green-glowing skeletons to a simple kiss that could sweep you off your feet. Feel chilling goosebumps rise on your arm as you hear the deafening sound of doom slowly approaching!

This short-story collection offers a variety of unknown worlds to humankind. You will be sitting on the edge of your seat because you will need to know more!

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you into writing?

I’m a 19-year-old girl who started writing at the age of twelve. I published my first book after I turned sixteen in 2019. I currently live in OH with my family. What got me in writing was when I had a sudden realization that I should write my own books. All I knew was that I loved reading, and thought I should become a famous author like the ones I read. Now that I’m thinking about it, it was an awe-inspiring moment that set me on my writing career path.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Well, for me I either have to be in the writing mood or I will typically write in the afternoon as I’m not a morning person. And I can write in just about any place.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

My ideas come from everything around me. Such as books, movies, people, places, etc.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I do a mixture of both. For books I’ve been writing a long time, I like to plan it out if I don’t have a particular word count I want to accomplish.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I write in fantasy, sci-fi, and adventure. I write in those genres because I love reading those genres. And because those genres are just the easiest to write.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

That is a tricky question. I really don’t know. I feel like my books would be more animated than live actions.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read every single day, even if it means reading five minutes before I go to bed. My favorite authors would have to be Brandon Sanderson, Rick Riordan, Shannon Messenger, and Jennifer Lynn Barnes.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

The books I’m currently reading are Spy Family number 6, Dune Messiah, and Cytonic.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

My favorite book would have to be A Star Named Vega because I finished it in one sitting. I absolutely loved the characters, storyline, and the world-building Benjamin J. Roberts created.

10: What advice would you give to someone thinking about becoming a writer?

If you’re becoming a writer, just know it takes time to craft your skills. And if you ever publish, make sure you have your book edited beforehand.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work? 

Here are my Social Media handles for people to find more about me and my work below,

Instagram: www.instagram.com/Ladyginnaandtheninjaseries

Twitter: @GortonJasmine

TikTok: www.tiktok.com/@JasmineMGorton

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ladyginnaandtheninjaseries

About the Author:

Jasmine M. Gorton is a young adult, who currently lives in Ohio now. She loves to write, read, and listen to music. She’s lives with a family of eight and is a huge fangirl for Marvel, DC, Star Wars, and other action movies out there. She loves reading graphic novels, manga, and novels. She is also a Christain who loves God. Her illustrator, Katherine E. Gorton, is her younger sister. She also has fan pages on Facebook and Instagram. The Facebook fan page is called The Ninja Series Jasmine M. Gorton. And Instagram is called Lady Ginna and The Ninja Series. She has four new books that are in the editing stages, and will be published later this year in 2021! Look out for the new reads, Imagination Land, The Chosen Sensei: A Ninja Series Prequel, The Chosen Purple Ninja: A Ninja Series Prequel, and a book called The One Shadow she is working with two other newly aspiring authors. Hope you all are having a wonderful day, and stay safe everyone!!

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Author Interview: ‘Again. Again and Again: Awakening into Awareness’ by Mathias B. Freese

About the Book:

Having once been a psychotherapist who’s never hesitated to turn the therapeutical gun barrel toward himself, Mathias B. Freese ramps up his radical reflexivity in this latest work, from confessional first-person narration to third-person “stories” starring “characters” named Matt. (This genre could be called meta-Matt.) “I write to know perhaps something about who I am,” Freese writes. “I write to arrive at some awareness, however dim, about self or other, for when I have that fleeting moment of awareness, I feel at one — true.” Truly, Again. Again and Again. is a song of himself.

Rocker Billy Idol proves to be an unlikely but apt echoer here: “When there’s nothing to lose and there’s nothing to prove, well, I’m dancing with myself.” As a one-man show, Freese puts the “dance” in “abundance,” stressing an author’s singularity, the innerness of writing, the sharing — rather than the proselytizing — purpose of artistic expression. In other words, as Freese says, “a book is one person’s awareness as he or she sees it.”

More than a few times, Freese had implied that Again. Again and Again. would probably be his swan song, his “final stirrings,” his ultimate testament. How laughable, considering both his prolificacy and “urge and urge and urge” (as Whitman would gush). Sure enough, the author is no longer so sure that he’s expressed enough, and it seems that yet another stirring idea spurs him to create again. Again and…

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing? 

Author, teacher and retired psychotherapist, one can never retire from writing. The subtitle of my most recent book, Again. again and again, a book of essays and stories, is “Awakening into Awareness.” I am not on a spiritual journey as life has taught me that I enter awareness gradually as I evolve. Kazantzakis’s epitaph reads: “I hope for nothing. I fear nothing. I am free.” What got me into writing was a primitive sense to express myself, then it became to know myself, and now in my old age it is to observe myself. I see writing as construction work and I just finished repairing my roof. More to work on. Consequently, I do not market my books nor target an audience. They are for me. It was Dinesen who summed up the artist: “An artist is never poor.” I own these hard-earned riches. 

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write? 

At my age let me be cranky. This is of no or little purpose. It is much to asking me if I ever use a pencil. Ask this question: How often do you draw upon your unconscious to express your thoughts and feelings, that is, how effectively do you use your associations as you write? 

3: Where do your ideas come from?  

The unconscious, the most reliable ghostwriter the writer ever has. I will argue that books are already written in the apses of our minds before we begin. We are unconscious creatures animated in human form and believe, mistakenly so, that we are in charge. Say Ukraine a thousand-fold, exponentially so, and you have proof we are driven by forces we cannot harness. 

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go? 

Think of Moby Dick and the sailors hunting whale in their boats, what was called a “Massachusetts hayride,” as the beast pulled them along. I find the best work for me is to be a story whisperer to the unconscious, soothing the beast if he wishes to be soothed, more often trusting in his desperate thrusts here and there, and when he breaches then I may have the start of a story. I had no idea that I would associate to the great whale and I offer it proof of what I am expressing — who really is in charge. 

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre? 

I generally like to write short stories and self-disclosing essays, often confessional. I am awakening to my intelligence and let the chips fall where they may. 

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book? 

Again, I don’t think in this way. I am the cast and the character of all my books. I am working on myself. I am investigating my short stay on this planet.  

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors? 

Kazantzakis, Krishnamurti, some Freud 

8: What book/s are you reading at present? 

A book on Reiki, a novel by Duff Brenna 

9: What is your favourite book and why? 

Report to Greco by Kazantzakis. It is a verbal Parthenon. See his The Last Temptation of Christ.  Greco is probably the best autobiography or confessional of the twentieth century 

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer? 

Buy olive oil and anoint yourself in the woods as a writer; buy a tube of epoxy to affix to your chair when you sit down to write. Stay away from advice, it usually sucks no matter how well intended. 

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?   

Go to my author’s page: www.amazon.com/Mathias-B-Freese/e/B000APHUQW. All nine of my books are listed, described and criticized.

About the Author:

MATHIAS B. FREESE is a writer, teacher, and psychotherapist who has authored eight books. His I Truly Lament: Working Through the Holocaust won the Beverly Hills Book Award, Reader’s Favorite Book Award, and was a finalist in the Indie Excellence Book Awards, the Paris Book Festival, and the Amsterdam Book Festival. In 2016, Tesserae: A Memoir of Two Summers, his first memoir, received seven awards. The following year his second memoir appeared,And Then I Am Gone.

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Author Interview: ‘Chambers of the Heart’ by B. Morris Allen

About the Book:

A heart that’s a building, a dog that’s a program, a woman who’s sinking irretrievably – stories about love, loss, and movement. A collection of speculative stories from author and editor B. Morris Allen.

  • Chambers of the Heart – when someone else’s heart is your home
  • Building on Sand – your own child or the child that needs you now?
  • Blush – when everyone else wears a mask, what’s it like to bare your face?
  • Minstrel Boy Howling at the Moon – magic, music, and … buffalo?
  • Fetch – she may be a simulation, but out on the edge, she’s one man’s best friend
  • The Humblebract Expedition – a play date for a dying child can only end in tragedy, right?
  • When Dooryards First in the Lilac Bloomed – a doorway to opportunity and change, if only they can understand it
  • Some Sun and Delilah – a sunny island, an abandoned temple, and … truth?
  • Crying in the Salt House – the house is built from tears, or so they say
  • Full of Stars – jar half empty, jar half full
  • Memory and Faded Ink – the aliens are perfectly human … and just as flawed
  • Fountainhead – arranged pairings never work, especially with different species
  • Adaptations to Coastal Erosion – what do you do when your spouse just sinks away, literally?
  • Outburst – Earth is dead, and the one remaining orbital can’t be saved, can it?
  • The Irrigation Ditch – they came to hide, but didn’t realize it was from each other
  • Dragons I Have Slain – take hope where you find it

Cover art by Bonnie Leeman.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Excerpt:

“Chambers of the Heart” excerpt.

Despair and Ecstasy are the simplest. Ecstasy is the small and cozy room of a cottage that looks out on a broad meadow in the forest. In the spring, elk come to posture and to mate, and the wildflowers bloom on every side. In the fall, mist dances in silver swirls framed by gold and bronze and copper trees. It is always spring or fall.

Despair is a vast, dark hall of low ceilings and small windows. In winter, snowdrifts sometimes cover the windows so that they are only squares of gray against black stone. In the summer, shafts of hot, bright light do nothing to warm the room, and only blind us to the room’s darkness, so that we must carry candles to the Master’s hard throne. It is always winter or summer.

Ecstasy and Despair are the simplest chambers, and the worst, and they are where the Master spends his time.

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I started writing a long time ago, when I was about 6 (so about 50 years ago). One of my very earliest pieces was preserved by my (probably mystified) parents, and can be found here: “The Orange Donkey” (https://www.bmorrisallen.com/oddities/the-orange-donkey/). I’m not sure it was my greatest writing accomplishment, but it is an early one.

Our house was full of all sorts of books, and I became a voracious reader from an early age, but I didn’t really try to write until college, but I didn’t have much tenacity — lots of starts, very few completed stories. One of those did become my first published story much later, but I didn’t take writing seriously until I finally decided to treat it like a job. I was, for the first time in decades, between jobs, so when my spouse left for work, I sat down to write all day. Much to my surprise, it mostly worked.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Ideally, I write when inspiration strikes, but I found after decades of trying that that’s a really terrible approach for me — inspiration and opportunity rarely coincide. Instead, an ideal time would be on a non-workday, after breakfast, with my spouse out gardening, the music on, and me covered with animals. It’s really a question of mindset; once I get going (which can take an hour), it usually flows reasonably well. Of course, there are some days when nothing works, and everything I write is terrible. On those days I just give up and do something else.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Everywhere. I get ideas constantly and forget half of them. But I have a file with hundreds of others. Sometimes the file notes are cryptic — there’s at least one that I know was a great idea, but I just can’t decipher what it was. I get a fair number of ideas from misheard lyrics. Or, much more rarely, from correctly heard lyrics that really struck me. That’s the case with at least two stories in my latest collection: “Minstrel Boy Howling at the Moon” is a straight steal from the title of a Jimmy La Fave song. “Dragons I Have Slain” is similarly a lyric from a Jon Lord song that bothered me, since I wouldn’t kill a dragon; the story was my way of working it out.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Both. I’m definitely a discovery writer — I find out about most of the story as I write it. But I almost always have a sense of the mood that I want to leave the reader with at the end, and I will often have a broad sense of the arc — where the story starts and where it ends. Sometimes I have a clever line, or an image, or a concept. I don’t usually start with characters — they emerge from the piece as I go.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I almost entirely write science fiction and fantasy. I have a number of mainstream novels in mind and have written a number of mainstream stories, but there’s just limited time to write, and the SFF ones are the ones that are most fun.

My interest in SFF very definitely came from a childhood Christmas present — the complete set of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Barsoom books (recently made into the terrible movie, John Carter of Mars. I’d read some SFF before then — Alan Garner’s The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, a few others — but when I found Barsoom, I immediately turned away from most of the ‘serious’ literature I was reading and turned mainly to science fiction and fantasy.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

My latest book is a short story collection, Chambers of the Heart, so I’ll answer instead with my first novel, Susurrus. It’s essentially the story of how an evil sorceress came to be one, tracing a sweet, desperately poor orphan as she finds a foster father and learns a little magic. In this world, each country has its own magic, and she’s uniquely able to learn more than one type, and to carry them across borders. Only, the more magic she learns, the worse her life gets, until she turns bitter and cruel. It’s a dark story (but there’s a happy ending), and it’s focused on this one woman, so I’d want a strong, talented actor to play her — Viola Davis would be perfect for the role. 

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read whenever I can. Sadly, between a full-time day job and running an SFF magazine (Metaphorosis), that’s not as often as I’d like. My favorite authors are probably Patricia A. McKillip, Roger Zelazny, Orson Scott Card (politics aside), James Thurber, Richard Adams, Richard Llewellyn, Dava Sobel, M.J. Engh, M.K. Wren. I could go on for ages. And of course I’m a fan of the authors I publish in my magazine and anthologies — newer voices like Vanessa Fogg, Molly Etta, L. Chan, Jason Baltazar, L’Erin Ogle, Laurel Beckley… Again, I could go on and on.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I’m re-reading M.K. Wren’s fantastic SF romance, Phoenix Legacy trilogy; Gate Thief, the second book in Orson Scott Card’s Mither Mages trilogy; Gardner Dozois’ The Best of the Best collected from his Year’s Best Science Fiction; and I think one or two others.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

That is a remarkably difficult question. If I really had to choose one, it might be Songmaster by Orson Scott Card. But I’d try to sneak in The Owl Service by Alan Garner; How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn; The Prince in Waiting by John Christopher; and After the Festival by George R.R. Martin.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Read. In my view, the key to becoming a writer is to read — a lot. Read constantly and read widely. I said that I read mostly SFF, and that’s true, but I’ve read a lot of other things as well. You don’t even, frankly, have to think analytically about what you read — just read a lot and you’ll absorb a sense of what works, as well as a rich vocabulary. Equally important, a sense of what you like and why.

Write. This sounds obvious, but many writers will tell you the same. You’re not a writer until you actually write something down, and ideally tell a complete story, and this latter part is much harder than it sounds. Don’t do what I did and waste decades assuming inspiration and opportunity will coincide. They won’t. Take writing seriously and work hard at it. Eventually, someday, what seemed daunting and impossible will turn easy and fun.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

I’m middle-aged, so social media is not my natural milieu, but I’m on Twitter pretty often @BMorrisAllen and @Metaphorosis. I’m very occasionally on Facebook at www.facebook.com/bmorrisallen.

About the Author:

B. Morris Allen is a biochemist turned activist turned lawyer turned foreign aid consultant, and frequently wonders whether it’s time for a new career. He’s been traveling since birth, and has lived on five of seven continents. When he can, he makes his home on the Oregon coast. In between journeys, he edits Metaphorosis magazine, and works on his own speculative stories of love and disaster. His dark fantasy novel Susurrus came out in 2017.

Find out more at www.BMorrisAllen.com

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Author Interview: ‘Things Happen’ by Christopher Acker

About the Book:

In these four stories, things happen.

  • A mother loses her son to a magic trick gone horribly wrong. Now a Google Maps car is trying to erase the last tangible memory she has of him.
  • Michelle lands her first big role in Hollywood as a prostitute in a Sam Cooke biopic. But her chance at stardom is jeopardized when riots break out after an innocent black man is murdered by the LAPD.
  • Everyone in St. Louis knows about the Salazar House of Horrors where a teenage girl was tortured and imprisoned. The prosecution asks Brandon—a model railroad enthusiast—to make a miniature replica of the infamous dungeon. The goal is to persuade the jury to put the monster behind bars forever. But constructing such degradation at 1/12th scale with his wife and two daughters lingering over his shoulder pushes Brandon and his family beyond their limit.
  • Disgraced journalist Alexander Reynolds is knee-deep in depression. Just about the only thing he can muster these days is slithering to his couch to watch The Maury Povich Show. In a sudden stroke of genius, a path out of his humiliation falls into his lap: he will fake his way to being a guest on Maury. There’s only one problem. He’ll need to convince his wife—the Oscar-winning filmmaker—to play a co-starring role.


The characters here are bruised, battered, and just plain exhausted. They’re like us. And like us, not everything works out for them. It’s this humanity that’s at the heart of this unforgettable collection.

Things Happen offers a poignant yet highly entertaining portrayal of people desperately looking for answers in a time when truth and facts are more elusive than ever. The themes of infidelity, unresolved grief, identity, redemption, and racial injustice are woven throughout, lending these short stories a degree of resonance every reader can connect with. And to keep things interesting, a celebrity or two might even make an appearance.

Above all else, Things Happen reflects what’s going on in this country right now:

A whole lot of something.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Excerpt:

Thank You, Mr. Povich for All That You Do

Murphy’s law, Alexander Reynolds thought. First, the toggle switch on their coffee maker crapped out, which forced him to drive twenty minutes in the rain to Wawa for a burnt cup of coffee. Then he sat on the toilet for half an hour with what felt like a prehistoric blockage. And now the remote. Not the remote exactly, but the batteries inside. They were dead.

He opened the back of the remote and reversed the two AA batteries to get the last bit of juice out of them. But no. The remote refused to change the channel. He then smacked the side with the palm of his hand, hoping a little mechanical CPR would resurrect the lifeless remote. Still, nothing.

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I am a husband, father of two wonderful girls (Violet and Emily), and clinical social worker living in Bridgewater, New Jersey. I’ve been writing fiction for nearly twenty years.

I first discovered my love for writing during my sophomore year at Rutgers University. I was taking a class called “The Short Story” and our professor had us read Raymond Carver’s “I Could See the Smallest Things.” The story is only six pages long but it changed my life. I had read minimalist stories before (e.g. Hemingway) but the way Carver created so much drama with zero plot to get in the way was like seeing a stupendous magic trick. And I just had to learn the secret! 

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Coffee shops usually get my creative juices flowing for me. Caffeine is my elixir.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

“Inspiration” usually hits me when I least expect it. Sometimes it’s a news article I stumble across. Other times, it’s a small detail (like a flattened Dunkin’ Donuts bag) that makes me think of a story. I’ve even written a story after a friend mutters something random that I think would make for an excellent line of dialogue.

In other words, my ears are always scanning for story ideas.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Let me admit something: I hate plot. Most of the time, plot gets in the way of character development. I prefer to read books and watch movies where there isn’t much of a plot. Characters must come before anything else.

That being said, I usually let the characters I create dictate where the story goes. Sometimes I have no clue how a story is going to end until I’ve written half of it. I let them tell me where the story needs to go. As long as I feel that I’ve created compelling, realistic characters that resonate with the reader, then half my job is done.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

Contemporary short stories are the genre I find myself returning to most often. I truly believe it’s more difficult (and more rewarding) to write and read a compelling story in ten pages than it is to write and read a 300-page novel.

“Get in, get out, don’t linger.” I forget where I heard this, but this is my mantra.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

I would try to find a role for Adam Driver. By far, he’s one of the most talented actors working today. His work in Marriage Story was amazing.

Other than that, I would like to cast unknown actors. I love movies with talented people you never heard of. I just watched a trailer for Paul Thomas Anderson’s new movie, Licorice Pizza, and the two leads are complete unknowns. Count me in! Sometimes, an actor’s celebrity status can detract from getting invested in the story. 

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

Since I’m usually the person that orders the same item from a restaurant, I don’t stray much from my three favorite authors: Raymond Carver, Cormac McCarthy, and Denis Johnson. I constantly re-read their books. For example, each time I read The Largesse of the Sea Maiden, I learn something else about the art of fiction writing. I consider this my schooling.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I’m not reading anything at the moment since I’m busy trying to promote my new collection of short stories, Things Happen, which was published on Amazon on November 15, 2021

The last book I read was Quentin Tarantino’s novelization for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. While both the movie and book are breezy and super fun, Tarantino is not a very good prose writer. But here’s the thing: I learn so much from reading a poorly-written book. I’m able to discover what doesn’t work in a story and then learn from that. Once again, this is like going to school for a writer.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

This is tough to narrow down but here I go.

My favorite collection of short stories is Raymond Carver’s Cathedral. I find it much more impactful than What We Talk About When We Talk About Love (not that I don’t adore that collection). The stories in Cathedral continue to blow me away. A writer at the top of his game!

My favorite novel is Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. I must’ve read it about ten times but it continues to give me goosebumps. I get so depressed reading it, not because of the content, but because no matter how hard I work at it, I will never become as good as a writer as Cormac McCarthy.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

My advice is twofold. First, write. Naturally, the more you do something, the more you get better at it. You learn from your mistakes. You can pick up things just by the act of writing more and more.

My second bit of advice is edit. This is a no-brainer. All of my first drafts are complete garbage. But with each round of editing, the real work takes place. Have a trusted friend give you some feedback during the editing process. Better yet, read your work aloud. The ears can find areas that need improvement that the eyes have trouble seeing.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

Facebook: www.facebook.com/christopherhowardacker

About the Author:

Christopher Acker is a husband, father, and full-time clinical social worker living in Bridgewater, New Jersey. His fiction has appeared in Change Seven, Crêpe & Penn, New Reader Magazine, Junto Magazine, The Ocotillo Review, Thing Magazine, Subtle Fiction, The Raven’s Perch, Inwood Indiana, Fictive Dream, Spelk, Firefly Magazine, The Molotov Cocktail, and No Extra Words. His work has also been featured on Wandsworth Radio in the UK.

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Author Interview: ‘Radio 11’ by Daniel Abrahams

About the Book:

Hot off his number one ‘hot new releases’ non-fiction book: 71/72: Football’s Greatest Season?, author Daniel Abrahams releases his second fictional short story collection.

The stories within, lurch from blood splattered tales of violent revenge, dark comedy to tales of life-long friendships pressured by life. An alternate universe, this book is sprinkled with short and when we say short, we mean short pieces. They rip off the page, leaving you to decide the intended outcome. As for the others, well, open the pages and find out.

Please note some content, featured at the back of the book, is taken from the Author’s early blogs featured on various websites, while an anarchic comedy revolving in around the office nightmare that is Secret Santa, has been seen on his website: dpabrahams.co.uk. So, if you already subscribe to the site, well you will have read them.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

OK, well I am a 53-year-old sports journalist, with a background in national daily newspapers in the UK and regionals. My love of writing started many years ago, I think the first think I wrote was a sequel script to Jaws. For some reason I didn’t get any calls from Stephen Spielberg. From there I tried comics, more films scripts and so on all for fun. Then, in 2012 I began ghost writing a non-fiction sports book, Through Adversity for our Sport, which was published in 2013. From there, I turned my hand to fiction shorts, some of which featured in my first self-published short story collection: books, bits & bobs.

The reaction from the book, which featured all sorts of pieces, was amazing. I must say it all really kicked off when an ex-girlfriend of mine broke my issues of finding my own writing style. I did the usual thing of trying to sound like my writing heroes, Thompson, Bukowski, Burrows et al and she simply said: ‘Just write like yourself’ and from that simple comment, which was so pure it just lit me up, I began writing properly. 

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Just somewhere quiet really. I find that all the pieces come out as they are, so some might have extensive notes, some I just sit and write, so the actual act of writing is done at the very last moment. But always in peace.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Ideas come from everywhere, but as my pieces mainly revolve around the human condition they are from experiences and those of others. I feel if you are always looking around, be it in songs, the world around you, through your emotions, memories, hopes, feelings, textures of clothes, moments of youth — everywhere, the gems of stories will just arrive. You simply have to be willing to look and feel these things. Then if you feel, and say with a song or film empathise with other creators, then you can somehow link into how they feel, but also tap into the feelings these things impart in you. The same with everyday life, and actions. That’s the key piece for me, if you feel the things you are writing about, if the words make you cry, smile, laugh etc, then it is real, and the reader can put themselves there. They will trust that you are not simply compiling a load of words to trick them, but you have actually been there, or understand, then the reader will trust you enough to believe it and unlock their experiences and with your words and be in the moment. 

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Mixed bag with this one. I have written pieces with no idea what is happening at all, just something like a feeling that I want to impart. I start writing and get the end. Others, I have a basic idea, beginning, middle, end. Some I have chapters all planned out. Stories are like children, they all come out the way they want. Well, that’s what I find anyway. For example, with a children’s story I have written, working title Jake and Friends, I acted out all the characters and recorded them. I had a loose outline of the running order and then went from there. Some short pieces I have written in cafes, pubs, on planes. One I wrote as I watched a girl look into a pub window in Camden, London. The girl was presumably looking for her friends, boyfriend, whatever, and I feel in with the idea of her and another character meeting or sharing something and started writing it then and there, leaving it pretty much untouched once it was written which was about an hour later.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I write as I feel, I have written dark adult thrillers, The Wooden Heart, short story collections which cover all sorts of pieces from: romance, to dystopian thrillers, to children’s books. I am currently working on my first novel, which is a gangland who done it, so all sorts.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Wow, what a great question, something I have never thought about that, so my mind is now racing. But Radio 11 is a short story compilation, so if I chose one of the pieces, I’d choose Sky’s The Limit. In some ways it touches on my friendship with my best friend in the world, Ivan. So, as it’s myself and him in there somewhere, I’d say Tom Hardy, or Paul Bettany for me or Tom Hanks as he seems to be the nicest person in the world and Christian Bale for Ivan. Pure self-indulgence of course, but thank you for allowing me to do that.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read as much as I can and never fail to love Charles Bukowski, and the Good Doctor, Hunter S. Thompson. I recently finished The Graduate, and although the film was simply lifted from it, (it was exactly the same) which made it a bit of an odd read, it showed me how good a book it was for that to be able to happen. But HST and Bukowski do it for me, I must say.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I Shot The Sheriff by Jay Myers. I know the author and it is his first western title, so I am reading that. I have just finished Jaws and am part way through Look Who’s Back, by Timur Vermes.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. It is exquisite in every way. I can feel the heat from the roads as Scout walks along them. The angst, boredom, amazement and anger the characters feel is mine. The world they live in, despite my having no experience of it per se, is transferred to my world in an instant. I know this is the aim of all books, but Lee does it faultlessly — wonderful. Everyone should read it.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Simply write. Just sit down and get into the worlds in your head. It’s unbelievable. Don’t worry about anyone reading it, and don’t do it for the money or even dream of making money out of it. To be completely blunt, Lisa (my ex-girlfriend) said it best, ‘write like yourself’, and do it for yourself. But do it.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

Website: www.dpabrahams.co.uk

Facebook: www.facebook.com/DPAbrahams

Twitter: @abrahamsdan390

Instagram: www.instagram.com/abrahamsdan390

About the Author:

Daniel Abrahams is a London born sports, entertainment and fashion journalist who has worked on numerous regional, national and international newspaper and magazine titles over the past 20 years. 

His new website is: DPAbrahams.co.uk – subscription is free and there is free exclusive subscriber content throughout the year, along with updates.

In 2013 he worked as ghostwriter on: Through Adversity: The Fight for Rugby League in the RAF. the title is available through Scratching Shed Publishing Ltd. http://www.scratchingshedpublishing.com 
ASIN: B00SLVEXRQ

For his first work of fiction, The Wooden Heart the author was granted use of lyrics by Bjork and her first band The Sugarcubes from their song Traitor and by Pete Voss lead singer of Campag Velocet from their song Ain’t No Funki Tangerine. The dark thriller deals with the last attempts of Dale to haul his life away from the pits of despair, before the reality of his selfish behaviour does more than just haunt his every waking hour. It was released on Amazon Kindle, in October 2016 and has received wide praise with numerous five star reviews. It is available using this link: http://amzn.eu/haaNRsQ

His second fiction release on Amazon Kindle, Books, Bits & Bobs is a compilation of short stories. Ranging from dark thriller ‘linear’ shorts, one paragraph thought provoking pieces to an apocalyptic novella of unseen proportions, Abrahams has drawn together a collection of his fiction writings stretching back to 2011. Books, Bits & Bobs swings from dreamlike states of romance and comedy, to tragedy, betrayal and beauty; traversing the everyday to the everlasting. Featuring characters who are reviled, revered, rampant and rabid, living on the edge of discovery or the brink of destruction. There is plenty to get your teeth into and your mind wondering. It is available using this link: http://amzn.eu/cIbq2X9

For an audio teaser of the first chapter of The Noise, featured in this title, simply visit this link: http://thenextbestbookblog.blogspot.co.uk/…

Latest web review of the The Wooden Heart:
www.jeyranmain.com/2017/11/04/the-wooden-heart-by-daniel-abrahams-book-review-328

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