Tag Archives: Thriller

Author Interview: ‘Germs of War’ by Ketan Desai

About the Book:

A book where bioterrorism meets international intrigue, politics, and Islamic fundamentalism.

What if ISIS had biological weapons? This nightmare scenario was first published in Germs of War in 1999, which predicted 9/11. A fast-paced amalgamation of science, international intrigue with rogue CIA agents battling terrorists, and shady politicians. Only a lonely student can thwart it all. Will she be able to?

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I am a physician and scientist who went into the biotechnology world after graduation. I founded three companies in the radiology and biotech industries. I have been writing since medical school, initially as a gag, but with the encouragement of readers, gradually more seriously.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

No, I write when and where the inspiration strikes.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

From all walks of life. It can be political, medical, spiritual. For example, the idea of my book Germs of War came to me when I was bored in a clinic with very few patients to occupy my time. The mind began to wander and pretty soon, the idea of bioterrorism based novel came to me. I wrote the book in a month.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Mere nubbins of an idea. It develops as it goes along.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

Mostly medical based thrillers. A cross between Robin Cook and Robert Ludlum.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Since the main character is a female, the lead would have to be a woman who can portray a strong woman. I don’t have any favorites there. Some Indian actors could pass of for the Afghan based terrorists.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favorite authors?

Not as much as I like since running of three companies and seeing patients one half day a week keeps me busy. I’d rather write than read others.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

None at the moment.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Collected stories of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conon Doyle. I really appreciate the attention to detail, solid plots, and deductive reasoning in the book.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Just start, and don’t give up.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

I just started on Facebook. Was a skeptic of Social Media for a long time, and am just beginning to see the value of FB.

Link: www.facebook.com/people/Ashoka-Chakra/100019072092418

About the Author:

Ketan Desai, MD Ph.D., Ketan Desai is a physician, entrepreneur who has 3 biotechnology and cosmetic companies, and a writer for seekingalpha.com and talkmarkets.com

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Author Interview: ‘Blood Brothers’ by Nick Pope

Divided by Hate

United by Honour

About the Book:

Two deadly but very different terror attacks bring carnage to London on the same day: a suicide bombing in the heart of Soho, and the shooting down of a military aircraft taking part in a ceremonial fly-past. Simultaneously, a previously-unknown Islamic radical calling himself Saladin declares a caliphate in the UK and decrees that all British Muslims should rise up against the infidel state.

The initial terror attacks are followed by sickening atrocities at Jewish schools, and in response to Saladin’s message, disaffected Muslim youths heed the call to arms, establishing Sharia patrols that bring terror to the streets. Others undertake lone-wolf marauding terror attacks. The resultant backlash plays into the hands of a charismatic right-wing politician and threatens to ignite a race war.

The Prime Minister authorises the creation of a multi-agency team, codenamed Artemis, led by an experienced MI5 analyst. This elite new unit brings together top experts from MI5, MI6, GCHQ and the SAS, in a desperate race against time to hunt down the terrorists before they can complete their murderous plan. They’re joined by a former enemy whose knowledge and skills might just be the key to unlocking the entire plot – if he can be trusted.

What people are saying:

“This is an excellent book and reads like a TV miniseries… a fast-paced, action packed read.” You Want To Read This

“Left my jaw dropped… I highly recommend this book.” Cherie Homan (Reviewer)

“The remarkable plot held me at the edge of my seat with a convincible cast of well-defined characters.” Paul Falk (Reviewer)

“I really enjoyed the book and there was a high degree of brotherhood that developed between two warriors who were on different sides of the apparent conflict between Islam and the West.” Steve Canipe (Educator)

“A enthralling book about a Jihadist plot to form a Islamic Caliphate in the UK. The plot is very believable and the some of the depicted events are extremely current, with similar attacks having taken place very recently… An exciting and well written novel.” Peter Coxall (Reviewer)

“A good spy novel… I really enjoyed the book.” Shelly Imholt (Reviewer)

“100% here for all those fans of thrillers with story lines that may be just around the corner. I loved this and so will you.” Ranger Harper (Reviewer)

“Highly recommended.” Lee Marriott-Dowding (Reviewer)

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I worked for the Ministry of Defence (MoD) for 21 years and while I had numerous postings in the course of my career, I’m best-known for having run the MoD’s UFO project – a job I did for much of the early Nineties. I took early retirement in 2006 and now live and work in the US, where I do consultancy and spokesperson work for various UFO/alien-themed movies, TV shows and video games, as well as a lot of freelance journalism and broadcasting on subjects that include the unexplained, conspiracy theories and fringe science. I gravitated to writing books because there’s such a lot of media and public interest in UFOs and the search for alien life, and I knew I had an interesting story to tell – within the confines of the Official Secrets Act, of course!

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I prefer to write in the late evening, after all the daily distractions are out of the way. I set up my laptop on the dining room table and try to write 1000 words each day. Sometimes, the creative process is further enriched by a cold beer or a chilled glass of Pinot Grigio!

3: Where do your ideas come from?

My non-fiction comes from real life, i.e. the research and investigation into UFOs and the unexplained that I undertook at the MoD. My fictional inspiration is more varied, and while some of it is loosely based on other things that I did at the MoD, ideas sometimes come to me from newspaper stories, from chance remarks from family or friends, or from my imagination. But I think that in most cases, art imitates life, which is why the biggest piece of fiction in many novels is probably the disclaimer that says all characters and events are fictitious and that any similarity to real people or events is purely coincidental! Lots of movies are prefaced by the statement “inspired by true events” and I think the same is true of most books (even fiction!), with heavy emphasis on the word “inspired” – authors should always be “inspired” by things. I certainly am!

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

If my literary agent is reading this, I ask that he looks away now. I know conventional wisdom is that one should have a detailed synopsis, and of course I do, because publishers require it. However, with my science fiction novels and with my action thriller, the story and the characters soon began to have ideas of their own! I recall Stephen King writing about how, with Salem’s Lot, his original idea was to have the vampires win. But King said that some of his characters turned out to be stronger than expected, and that Ben Mears wanted to be a hero, so he “let him be what he wanted to be”. This is exactly what happened with my latest novel, Blood Brothers, when a minor character called Ashraf Abdul Khan grew beyond his original role and turned into someone who – only after I’d finished writing the book – I realized was a modern-day Long John Silver. Once a character evolves into something other than what was originally envisaged, events tend to diverge from the original plan too.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I’ve written three non-fiction books about UFOs, based on my government work on this topic. All three needed official security clearance and I’ve really only been able to write about this because the MoD has itself declassified and released most of the files about my old government job – a process with which I’ve been involved. I wrote two science fiction novels about alien invasion, combining what I knew about UFOs with more conventional warfighting information. My latest book, Blood Brothers, is an action thriller about terrorism in the UK, and was inspired by my final MoD posting as an acting deputy director in the Directorate of Defence Security. I’m currently writing the sequel, Old Enemies, set in the same fictional universe and featuring many of the same characters. I have plans for further novels in the series, doing what Tom Clancy did with his Jack Ryan novels, where he was able to incorporate some really slow-burning story arcs.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

I’d like to see Faran Tahir as the enigmatic, conflicted Ashraf Abdul Khan, Jessica Chastain as the brilliant and strong-willed MI5 analyst Jenny Fairbanks, and John Simm as the tough-but-clever SAS officer Matt Quill. Khan is the most complex character, and it’s a challenging role for an actor, especially with the controversy over some of the themes covered in Blood Brothers. There’s already been some interest in film/TV rights, so it’ll be interesting to see how this pans out and what actors are actually cast, if something gets greenlit.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read a lot, both non-fiction and fiction. I love war histories and biographies by authors such as Antony Beevor and Simon Sebag Montefiore, but also really enjoy Lee Child’s Jack Reacher novels, Stephen King’s horror, and pretty much anything that Tom Clancy or Anne Rice ever wrote! And as a sci-fi fan, I’ve got to namecheck the fabulous Isaac Asimov, Connie Willis and Frank Herbert.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I’m a true crime buff and I’m currently reading Fatal Vision, by Joe McGinness, which tells the tragic, disturbing and controversial story of Jeffrey MacDonald and the murder of his wife and two young daughters. It’s a long, detail-rich book that really draws the reader into the story and the characters.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. I first read it when I was around 12 and I’ve re-read it several times since. I don’t want to repeat all the usual clichés about how it proved to be so prophetic, because for me, what really makes the book is the cleverness and complexity of the fictional universe that Orwell created. As a writer, I was particularly intrigued by the concept of Newspeak, which cleverly explores the relationship between thinking and language.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

This is probably a cliché, but before you write, read! And pay attention to what works for you as a reader, and what doesn’t, whether it’s plot development, character-building or dialogue. Reading widely, across a range of genres, and learning from the authors’ techniques should be your start point, but then you should ask yourself if you have the genuine hunger and passion for it – not because you want fame and fortune (as is the case in all professions, only a tiny handful of people make it to the top), but because you have the drive to want to create a fictional universe populated by characters you’ll come to love (or hate) and in which interesting, life-changing events occur.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

My www.nickpope.net website is the best place to find out about my work. There’s a section devoted to my books (with links to the relevant Amazon pages) and on the home page there are links to my Facebook and Twitter pages, which can be found below.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/nickpopeofficial

Twitter: @nickpopemod

 

About the Author:

Nick Pope used to run the British Government’s UFO project. From 1991 to 1994 he researched and investigated UFOs, alien abductions, crop circles and other strange phenomena, leading the media to call him the real Fox Mulder. His government background and his level-headed views have made him the media, film and TV industry’s go-to guy when it comes to UFOs, the unexplained and conspiracy theories.

As the world’s leading expert on UFOs, Nick Pope has consulted on, and helped to promote a number of alien-themed movies, TV shows and video games. He has presented, consulted on and contributed to numerous TV shows, has written five best-selling books, and lectures all around the world.

Nick Pope lives in America.

 

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Book Review: ‘The Teenage Spy’ by Naila

Title: The Teenage Spy

Published: 1st April 2017

Publisher: Notion Press

Author: Naila

 

Synopsis:

Everybody loves to dream. They dream of becoming what they want. One such extraordinary dream was that of William Dunk. A teenager, living in North Bellwood, William Dunk aspires to become a spy. Growing up among spy novels and movies, he consequently loses his interest in his medical studies that his father Richard Dunk, a well Known businessman, had pushed him to do. His obsession for becoming a spy results in his expulsion from high school. His father loses his calm and banishes him from his mansion. William moves to South Bellwood and finds a best friend in his neighbor. The two embark on a mission to fulfill William’s dream. But is it really easy to go through after what one wants they get? After all, Bigger the aims, bigger the risks!

 

Review:

An interesting novella that follows William while he tries to make his childhood dream of becoming a spy a reality – let’s see how that goes.

William wants to be a spy so tends to explain things in a way that you would by breaking down information with a case. It’s just a shame that his school and father have no interest in him being one, thinking it is just a passing phase that he just won’t leave behind. After being expelled from school, and then subsequently thrown out of the house by his father, he goes to live in his late grandma’s old empty house. This sees him soon makes friends with Ryan, and after telling him his dream of being a detective and/or spy, they soon try to locate an agency where he can work and hone in his skills.

After what seems like a wasted day going round so many places and finding squat they hold out everything on the last place on the list. Seems this place is a hit and luckily comes with a dorm – good job too with William’s serious lack of funds. It seems Mr. Wood, the head of agency, thought he came across as someone to watch so sets Mr. Dancey the task of training him. William just has to make it through the first stage of training before he is admitted into the U.M.A – Undercover Missions Agency, which is the real deal with spy agencies.

Training begins with tests along the way to see if he has what it takes to be a true agent. With how much he wants it you know he will fly through. Cases soon pile up but when they get a bit too close to home things get dicey.

The SF agency is the darker side of the agency world where people pay them to do their dirty work. One person on the payroll is a doctor who hypnotizes his patients to do the deeds for them. Win-win as nothing comes back to them. When a few UMA agents fall foal and commit murders William steps up to try to figure things out and take them all down. Can he save the day or will he get caught in the crossfire’s?

Interesting starting point but I think it needed a bit more work done to it to make it a cleaner read. It kept jumping between present and past tense and at times it seemed like a word or two was missing or needed taking out from the sentence for it to make sense. Not much of a twist but more just flowing through from one case to the next. There may be a bit of danger along the way but it’s nothing he can’t handle.

2 for edit and 3 for story out of 5 stars

I received a copy of this book from the author for my honest review.

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Book Blitz and Author Interview: ‘Jagdlied: a Chamber Novel’ by Dolly Gray Landon

Title: Jagdlied: a Chamber Novel

For Narrator, Musicians, Pantomimists, Dancers & Culinary Artists

Text by: Dolly Gray Landon

Music by: Gary Lloyd Noland

Graphic by: Lon Gaylord Dylan

Publisher: Gary L Noland

Genre: Literary fiction / Erotica / Thriller / Humorous

 

About the Book:

This musically and graphically enriched chamber novel is an over-the-top black and blue comic extravaganza about the conspiratorial undoing of a teenage entitlement princess. The story throbs throughout with an undercurrent of apocalyptic motifs related to the extinction of art, fall of empire, and coming of the Antichrist. It is an epic farce that reads like an erotically supercharged psychological suspense thriller. The narrative takes the reader/audient on a veritable boomerang roller-coaster ride (with multiple inversions) through a reputational strip-and-whiptease of the novel’s malignantly artful (albeit ingenuously doe-eyed) protagonist: a wealthy young heiress and socialite who boasts an exclusive claim to her progenitors’ munificent estate. Her inheritance comprises an immense fortune amassed through shareholder investments in the world’s largest employment recruiter: the multi-national temp agency behemoth known as the Pleasant Peasant Corporation.

The character-driven narrative of Jagdlied explores themes of jilted love, misinterpreted motives, paranoid ideations, bombastic egos, ghoulish envy, smoldering jealousy, unconscionable revenge ploys, extravagant public humiliations, ruthless power games, insatiable greed, pernicious corruption, feigned moral outrage from all sides, and even (Heaven forfend!) coldblooded murder—all the type of stuff pre-calculated to magnetize your run-of-the-thrill-seeking bookworms and bibliophiles.

A rich repository of tongue-in-cheek nonce words, malapropisms, neologisms, archaisms, spoonerisms, slanguage, and whole swaths of unintelligible nonsense, the text of Jagdlied is also replete with irreverently lurid, salacious, and scatologic elements, which serve to set it in motion as a formidable contender for the distinctive cachet of being regarded (by cultivated aesthetes of omnifarious persuasions) as a momentously serious dirty book. It is targeted towards percipient readers and audients in possession of a well-seasoned sick and—dare it be said—cruel batch of funny bones inflected with a gallows-cum-smoking-room bent.

Whilst the plot of this story (grotesquely absurd as it will undoubtedly be esteemed) embraces reflexively cringeworthy sadomasochistic motifs, its author would hesitate to instyle it as porn, yet he would not be wholly disinclined to characterize it as a farcical parody thereof. And whilst at the same time its author is admittedly predisposed to eschew ascribing labels of any kind to this opus (especially seeing as what he has concocted is so rarefied in its formal structure that it cannot be facilely pigeonholed), it may not be altogether off the mark to view it as a form of literary neurotica (if, indeed, there is such a genre) as opposed to the more boilerplate literotica—or what in sex nazi circles is dysphemistically adverted to (in no uncertain squirms) as “filth.”

Whilst the text of Jagdlied may be read in silence as a novel in the traditional sense, it is ultimately written for the purpose of being recited by a skilled elocutionist to the accompaniment of extemporized music by ad hoc variable ensembles in relatively brief, self-contained or—depending on how one looks at it—semi self-contained episodes with the aid of a do-it-yourself improvisation kit provided in its appendix. This “kit” is likenable to a Baroque-style table of ornaments, albeit comprehending specific sets of chance operations for each and every participant involved in renditions of individual fascicles of this work. Aside from entailing a professional narrator and musical extemporizers, the score discretionarily calls for pantomime actors, dancers (hence choreographers), set designers, culinary artists, and even members of the audience itself.

 

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Five star review from Literary Titan

www.literarytitan.com/2018/07/30/jagdlied-a-chamber-novel-for-narrator-musicians-pantomimists-dancers-culinary-artists

 

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

 

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

As a composer, I have been interested for many years in writing texts that can be narrated to extemporized music.  I especially enjoy performing the texts at the piano with other musicians. What got me started writing (you ask)…? That would probably best be discussed in a private room with a disorders analyst. J

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I function best early in the day but often continue well into the night. I am either at my screen or at the piano, depending on what creative activities I am involved in.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

The ideas, if there are any, emerge out of the creative process itself. I usually have to improvise at the piano or write something down in order to generate new material. My experience as a composer has had a profound impact upon my prose writing. Ideas are a dime a dozen. It is the skill, motivation, and stick-to-itiveness to develop them into polished, refined, and finished works of art that separates the sheep from the goats. I’ve encountered a lot of highly intelligent people with excellent ideas who are too effete and unmotivated to bring them to fruition, as if they imagined, somehow, that their ideas, in and of themselves, are tantamount to the end products. I once had a brief conversation with a well-known music theorist who said, “I could bang out a fugue everyday if I wanted to, but what would be the point?” Perhaps it was true, and if so, he was depriving the world of hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of fugues (whether they’d be good or not is anybody’s guess). Of course, there’s a difference between boasting one can do something and actually doing it. I can’t imagine this particular theorist will be eulogized for the thousands of fugues he “could” have written. I suppose I’m articulating the old one-percent-genius-99-percent-perspiration adage, so please excuse me if I’m beating a dead horse.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

To give an example: I began work on my chamber novel Jagdlied in 1991 with no intention other than to sketch out a salacious five- or six-page short story as a brief diversion from other more ambitious musical projects. It grew into a twenty-page story, at which point I decided to set it aside as a “completed” work, even going so far as to affix an opus number to it in my otherwise (mostly) musical oeuvre. I moved on to other projects. When I returned to the story about eleven years later, I was dissatisfied with what I had written. I felt the characterizations were flat and the use of language too bland and conventional to suit my tastes, so I performed some deeper edits and revisions on it until the piece transmogrified into a much more vivid novella of approximately 60 pages. A literary agent contacted me who was interested in promoting it but I didn’t take him up on it, as I didn’t feel it was ready to be released into the world. Only semi-satisfied with what I had written, I set the text aside for another eight-or-so years and, upon returning to it, assumed it might need some minor edits. Little did I realize then that I would be embarking upon the creation of a 230,000-word magnum opus containing 290 graphic scores, an elaborate system by which musicians could extemporize against the text while it’s being narrated, and over 100 YouTube links to performances of my compositions to lend further musical weight to the novel proper. To answer your question: I almost never know in advance exactly how a piece (whether literary or musical) will turn out. It happens, as you suggest, organically while it is being created. I learn more and more about the characters of a novel as the situations and dialogues are interpolated into its structure. My own life experiences inform the transmutation of a work’s gestalt. There are, as you know, many creative people who meticulously plan their works in advance of committing them to paper. That has never been my modus operandi.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I would like to believe that I have invented my own genre—the “chamber novel,” namely: a literary text that is the focal point, or thread, of a piece that holds all the other noise encompassing it (i.e., the music, choreography, pantomimicry, audience participation, etc.) together into a cohesive whole, wherewithout there would be naught but chaos and confusion. To answer your question more specifically, my writings may be classifiable as literary fiction. Whilst the texts are, indeed, influenced by many fiction genres, it is impossible to pigeonhole them into any single specific genre. I would like, however, to view these texts as a form of musical expression.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

I have been out of touch with films and television for many years. However, a more apropos question might be what dream cast of performing musicians I would envision for the realization of my chamber novel. In a perfect world I would enlist piano improvisers on a par with Robert Levin, Gabriela Montero McElroy, Frederic Rzewski, Uri Caine, or Marc-André Hamelin (among others) to perform musical commentaries to the text in real time while it’s being narrated. Will Self, Steven Pinker, John Oliver, or Seth MacFarlane would make, I believe, excellent elocutionists. Of course, any well-trained actor who knows and understands the text and can recite it with fluency and depth would be more than welcome to perform it. I’m not certain that this would be the right sort of book for a Hollywood film, as it doesn’t fit the mold. I could, however, imagine a serious director like Lars von Trier or Terry Zwigoff producing a film based on my text. I would entrust them to choose the actors.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I have loved reading since I was young but was never formally trained in English Literature. My academic training is in Music. The writers I most admire are not necessarily the ones whose books I most enjoy reading. I feel great admiration for Will Self, who can be difficult at times. I think Alexander Theroux is, arguably, one of the best living American writers, notwithstanding that, for unfathomable reasons, his works have failed to find a place into the literary canon. David Hirson is a brilliant playwright, but has only written two plays I know of. Of course, one would be hard-pressed not to admire David Foster Wallace, whose career trajectory skyrocketed after his suicide. I could jabber on and on about writers who have moved and influenced me in various ways…

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

My reading habits are less organized than when I was younger. I dip into dozens of books at a time, with the intention of eventually reading everything (unless they are intolerably turgid, dull, or badly written). At the moment I am reading “Cult X” by Fuminori Nakamura, “My Favorite Thing is Monsters” by Emil Ferris, “Walking to Hollywood” by Will Self, “King Leopold’s Ghost” by Adam Hochschild, “The Bone Clocks” by David Mitchell, “The Plot Against America” by Phillip Roth (to name a few).

9: What is your favourite book and why?

That’s a difficult question. It’s a relatively rare book that knocks my socks off, although it has happened on occasion. Many of the following works may seem like obvious clichés, as one would necessarily assume they are universally acknowledged: Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, Orwell’s 1984 (and a lot of his lesser known fiction & essays), John Kennedy Toole’s Confederacy of Dunces (which I read over thirty years ago and which, upon re-reading it years later, disappointed me somewhat, as the writing itself was not quite as sharp and incisive as I had remembered it, which is not to disparage the writer’s talent in any way), virtually everything by Kafka, some works by Kobo Abe, Kazuo Ishiguro, Stanislaw Lem, and many others. One novel that bowled me over and convinced me, upon reading it, that it was one of the greatest novels in the English language, was Alexander Theroux’s Darconville’s Cat (an opinion shared by Anthony Burgess). Theroux’s more recent (2007) novel Laura Warholic (a 700+ page tome) is also intoxicatingly subversive but not as well known as Darconville’s Cat, probably on account of its being sloppily edited in a few places, which doesn’t diminish the fact that there is quotable material in virtually every paragraph of the text. I love David Hirson’s play La Bête, which was panned by the critics on its initial release in 1991 but later received loud critical acclaim when it was revived internationally some twenty years later. As a composer, I am partial to Christopher Miller’s Sudden Noises from Inanimate Objects. His other books aren’t bad either.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

I am not one to offer advice but to solicit it.  “Blind leading the blind,” etc.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

You can go to my Twitter account, where I occasionally post performances of my music and text pieces (in particular, fascicles from my chamber novel Jagdlied): @species7th

Also, you can visit the Dolly Gray Landon Page I set up in Facebook, which is brand new: www.facebook.com/chambernovel.Jagdlied

I will be posting things there as well. Of course, my regular Facebook page is open to the public (as far as I am aware). I post my Youtube videos there on occasion: www.facebook.com/gnoland1

 

For information on the availability for purchase of the six released CDs of my musical compositions, go to: www.northpacificmusic.com

 

If you’d like to listen to one of my pieces (Grande Rag Brillante for piano) on the spot, check it out here:

About the Author:

I suppose I should make it known, to dispel any confusion that might arise, that I have chosen to employ as pen names two anagrams of my real name. I go by my actual name—Gary Lloyd Noland—as the composer, Lon Gaylord Dylan as the illustrator of graphic scores, and Dolly Gray Landon as the author of the text of Jagdlied. I do this in part because American culture has a peculiar incapacity to accept a creative artist wearing more than one hat.

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Book Blitz and Author Interview: ‘The Poetic Murderer’ by Christoph Burmeister

Title: The Poetic Murderer

Author: Christoph Burmeister

Genre: Crime / Thriller / Mystery

 

 

About the Book:

A MYSTERY OF FOLLOWING YOUR DREAMS

“Fear will learn to fear you!”

Detective 00 Hansen is an enigmatic dreamer in the streets of Copenhagen, riding a fast antelope, and living a slow life (not to the delight of his wife).

In The Poetic Murderer, Hansen and Don Cindy’s first mystery, the duo are informed by Denmark’s Queen Marmalade II and Prince Sandwich about an unimaginable murder at the supermarket. The body is marked by violence and the murder weapon an unhygienic rainbow trout.

The police are baffled by the mysterious poem at the crime scene. But when Detective 00 Hansen applies his left elbow to the problem he uncovers a tragic tale of unrequited love and deadly lust… Will he stop the poetic murderer on the quest of a dream and fulfilment of his own destiny?

P.S. An unaesthetic fear of the unknown haunts us, namely the unforeseen. A fear that shapes our lives. No human can unlearn to fear; we all have to learn how to deal with it. By picking up this novel, the reader travels a new route and sparks enthusiasm to live a freer life.

What people are saying:

“… My transformation is profoundly obvious!”
–Anne Mone

“… Everybody must read this book!”
–Jessica Bananas

“I am just amazed with the positive energy I’m radiating now.”
–Miss Behave

“All my fears have been spirited away.”
–Brian D’Amage

“Chapeau! Great entertainment & much laughter.”
–Petra Panini

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

When I was a kid I fell in love with the sound of words. I would play with rhymes and alliterations and sort of bend their proper spellings just for fun. I also found it always very pleasant to twist reality in ways that would appeal to my imagination. However, I couldn’t see for myself that writing may be a path for me. Instead, I studied economics and worked as a treasury manager, although deep inside I always knew that this wasn’t what I really wanted to do in life. One day, I looked into the mirror and could not quite recognize myself. I quit my job. 2015 — Creative Writing at Cambridge University. It’s been such a joy to me sharing and feeling connected to people through writing, for which I decided to write a book.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Not really. I like to keep it fresh and switch places, whenever I have the feeling to sit in a museum and the imagination grows stale.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

I like to write about immediate perceptions in a fantastic way. For instance, I saw a woman wearing high heels, who couldn’t wear them, walking like a T-Rex in marshlands.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

The novel grows organically, like life itself.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

My debut novel fits into the genre Humorous Detective Fiction. My state of mind in those days drew me to that genre.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Hmm… Jim Carrie as bumbling detective and Anthony Hopkins in the role of the villain.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I do like to read extensively. Although things change, I am reading all the works of James Joyce, Hunter S. Thompson, and Dylan Thomas.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

Currently, I am reading Great Shark Hunt by Hunter S. Thompson.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

The Little Prince, because it is based on the boundless imagination of children.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Develop your own style. Finding your own style is everything. Let me put it that way: you’re not Andy Warhol, because you hang gay at the wall so, you’ve to figure out what you want to say and how you’re going to say it… read and write until the words are pouring out of you like wine from a bottle.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

Facebook: www.facebook.com/detective00

Instagram: www.instagram.com/cb_writer

 

About the Author:

 

Christoph Burmeister was born on the 16 April 1987 in Bad Oldesloe on the river Trave. That’s why he originally wanted to become a clown.

On school days he dreamed wholeheartedly. University was no hindrance to him; it was his hobby. He would carefully fashion his appearance as an eager student.

After graduation, the money bell rang, and he started working for a shipping company as a treasury manager. One day he took a glimpse into the mirror and did not recognise himself, so he left home and moved to Copenhagen.

All of a sudden: Hygge!

2015—Creative Writing at the University of Cambridge, then Improv theatre. Now his first novel: The Poetic Murderer.

Christoph likes Jazz and his simplistic life-style resonates with mystery and beauty. His right hand is the instrument of his daily writing practise.

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