Tag Archives: Science Fiction

Author Interview: ‘Chambers of the Heart’ by B. Morris Allen

About the Book:

A heart that’s a building, a dog that’s a program, a woman who’s sinking irretrievably – stories about love, loss, and movement. A collection of speculative stories from author and editor B. Morris Allen.

  • Chambers of the Heart – when someone else’s heart is your home
  • Building on Sand – your own child or the child that needs you now?
  • Blush – when everyone else wears a mask, what’s it like to bare your face?
  • Minstrel Boy Howling at the Moon – magic, music, and … buffalo?
  • Fetch – she may be a simulation, but out on the edge, she’s one man’s best friend
  • The Humblebract Expedition – a play date for a dying child can only end in tragedy, right?
  • When Dooryards First in the Lilac Bloomed – a doorway to opportunity and change, if only they can understand it
  • Some Sun and Delilah – a sunny island, an abandoned temple, and … truth?
  • Crying in the Salt House – the house is built from tears, or so they say
  • Full of Stars – jar half empty, jar half full
  • Memory and Faded Ink – the aliens are perfectly human … and just as flawed
  • Fountainhead – arranged pairings never work, especially with different species
  • Adaptations to Coastal Erosion – what do you do when your spouse just sinks away, literally?
  • Outburst – Earth is dead, and the one remaining orbital can’t be saved, can it?
  • The Irrigation Ditch – they came to hide, but didn’t realize it was from each other
  • Dragons I Have Slain – take hope where you find it

Cover art by Bonnie Leeman.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Excerpt:

“Chambers of the Heart” excerpt.

Despair and Ecstasy are the simplest. Ecstasy is the small and cozy room of a cottage that looks out on a broad meadow in the forest. In the spring, elk come to posture and to mate, and the wildflowers bloom on every side. In the fall, mist dances in silver swirls framed by gold and bronze and copper trees. It is always spring or fall.

Despair is a vast, dark hall of low ceilings and small windows. In winter, snowdrifts sometimes cover the windows so that they are only squares of gray against black stone. In the summer, shafts of hot, bright light do nothing to warm the room, and only blind us to the room’s darkness, so that we must carry candles to the Master’s hard throne. It is always winter or summer.

Ecstasy and Despair are the simplest chambers, and the worst, and they are where the Master spends his time.

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I started writing a long time ago, when I was about 6 (so about 50 years ago). One of my very earliest pieces was preserved by my (probably mystified) parents, and can be found here: “The Orange Donkey” (https://www.bmorrisallen.com/oddities/the-orange-donkey/). I’m not sure it was my greatest writing accomplishment, but it is an early one.

Our house was full of all sorts of books, and I became a voracious reader from an early age, but I didn’t really try to write until college, but I didn’t have much tenacity — lots of starts, very few completed stories. One of those did become my first published story much later, but I didn’t take writing seriously until I finally decided to treat it like a job. I was, for the first time in decades, between jobs, so when my spouse left for work, I sat down to write all day. Much to my surprise, it mostly worked.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Ideally, I write when inspiration strikes, but I found after decades of trying that that’s a really terrible approach for me — inspiration and opportunity rarely coincide. Instead, an ideal time would be on a non-workday, after breakfast, with my spouse out gardening, the music on, and me covered with animals. It’s really a question of mindset; once I get going (which can take an hour), it usually flows reasonably well. Of course, there are some days when nothing works, and everything I write is terrible. On those days I just give up and do something else.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Everywhere. I get ideas constantly and forget half of them. But I have a file with hundreds of others. Sometimes the file notes are cryptic — there’s at least one that I know was a great idea, but I just can’t decipher what it was. I get a fair number of ideas from misheard lyrics. Or, much more rarely, from correctly heard lyrics that really struck me. That’s the case with at least two stories in my latest collection: “Minstrel Boy Howling at the Moon” is a straight steal from the title of a Jimmy La Fave song. “Dragons I Have Slain” is similarly a lyric from a Jon Lord song that bothered me, since I wouldn’t kill a dragon; the story was my way of working it out.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

Both. I’m definitely a discovery writer — I find out about most of the story as I write it. But I almost always have a sense of the mood that I want to leave the reader with at the end, and I will often have a broad sense of the arc — where the story starts and where it ends. Sometimes I have a clever line, or an image, or a concept. I don’t usually start with characters — they emerge from the piece as I go.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I almost entirely write science fiction and fantasy. I have a number of mainstream novels in mind and have written a number of mainstream stories, but there’s just limited time to write, and the SFF ones are the ones that are most fun.

My interest in SFF very definitely came from a childhood Christmas present — the complete set of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Barsoom books (recently made into the terrible movie, John Carter of Mars. I’d read some SFF before then — Alan Garner’s The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, a few others — but when I found Barsoom, I immediately turned away from most of the ‘serious’ literature I was reading and turned mainly to science fiction and fantasy.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

My latest book is a short story collection, Chambers of the Heart, so I’ll answer instead with my first novel, Susurrus. It’s essentially the story of how an evil sorceress came to be one, tracing a sweet, desperately poor orphan as she finds a foster father and learns a little magic. In this world, each country has its own magic, and she’s uniquely able to learn more than one type, and to carry them across borders. Only, the more magic she learns, the worse her life gets, until she turns bitter and cruel. It’s a dark story (but there’s a happy ending), and it’s focused on this one woman, so I’d want a strong, talented actor to play her — Viola Davis would be perfect for the role. 

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read whenever I can. Sadly, between a full-time day job and running an SFF magazine (Metaphorosis), that’s not as often as I’d like. My favorite authors are probably Patricia A. McKillip, Roger Zelazny, Orson Scott Card (politics aside), James Thurber, Richard Adams, Richard Llewellyn, Dava Sobel, M.J. Engh, M.K. Wren. I could go on for ages. And of course I’m a fan of the authors I publish in my magazine and anthologies — newer voices like Vanessa Fogg, Molly Etta, L. Chan, Jason Baltazar, L’Erin Ogle, Laurel Beckley… Again, I could go on and on.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I’m re-reading M.K. Wren’s fantastic SF romance, Phoenix Legacy trilogy; Gate Thief, the second book in Orson Scott Card’s Mither Mages trilogy; Gardner Dozois’ The Best of the Best collected from his Year’s Best Science Fiction; and I think one or two others.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

That is a remarkably difficult question. If I really had to choose one, it might be Songmaster by Orson Scott Card. But I’d try to sneak in The Owl Service by Alan Garner; How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn; The Prince in Waiting by John Christopher; and After the Festival by George R.R. Martin.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Read. In my view, the key to becoming a writer is to read — a lot. Read constantly and read widely. I said that I read mostly SFF, and that’s true, but I’ve read a lot of other things as well. You don’t even, frankly, have to think analytically about what you read — just read a lot and you’ll absorb a sense of what works, as well as a rich vocabulary. Equally important, a sense of what you like and why.

Write. This sounds obvious, but many writers will tell you the same. You’re not a writer until you actually write something down, and ideally tell a complete story, and this latter part is much harder than it sounds. Don’t do what I did and waste decades assuming inspiration and opportunity will coincide. They won’t. Take writing seriously and work hard at it. Eventually, someday, what seemed daunting and impossible will turn easy and fun.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

I’m middle-aged, so social media is not my natural milieu, but I’m on Twitter pretty often @BMorrisAllen and @Metaphorosis. I’m very occasionally on Facebook at www.facebook.com/bmorrisallen.

About the Author:

B. Morris Allen is a biochemist turned activist turned lawyer turned foreign aid consultant, and frequently wonders whether it’s time for a new career. He’s been traveling since birth, and has lived on five of seven continents. When he can, he makes his home on the Oregon coast. In between journeys, he edits Metaphorosis magazine, and works on his own speculative stories of love and disaster. His dark fantasy novel Susurrus came out in 2017.

Find out more at www.BMorrisAllen.com

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Book Blitz: ‘The Solar Realm’ by PM Black

Title: The Solar Realm

Author: PM Black

Genre: Fantasy

Sub-Genre: Science Fiction

About the Book:

Empress Saltome, sovereign of the eight planets, has been captured through an act of betrayal by blood-thirsty demons who plan to make the billions under her rule their personal livestock.

Hope for the survival of her people lies in Kora, an infamous assassin and loyal protector of the Empress who evaded capture with the Imperial Orb, the source of the Empress’ power. Kora is charged to deliver the orb and protect seventeen-year-old Jenanine Blackwater, the secret heir apparent of the realm and, outside of the Empress, the sole individual with the ability to wield the orb’s power.

Growing up in a hidden palace kingdom void of the racial hate plaguing her two largest neighbors, Jeanine can’t wait to begin her training as Empress. She wants to bring peace and well-being throughout The Eight while wearing the most fabulous dresses and hosting the most lavish balls.  

When Kora crash lands on their planet, she brings with her a league of demons and assassins hunting to destroy the Imperial Orb. The fate of The Eight now rests on a small band of warriors and a wide-eyed, young girl who has never left the hidden valley of her home. But what will happen when the few allies Jenanine has turn out to be her biggest threat?

Empress Saltome

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Amazon – UK / US

Jenanine Blackwater

About the Author:

PM Black is an avid fantasy reader and enjoys J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, Brandon Sanderson and everything in between. When she’s not nose deep into a book (or tablet), she loves watching movies, especially anything in the Marvel Universe. Essentially, any chance to dive into another world, she’s there. 

But don’t let those interests fool you! Most of her day is spent chasing around 3 little kids, ages 6, 5, and 2.5. She knows the school car drop-off line intimately, can chase down a very agile toddler with a handful of groceries, and can recite Llama Llama Red Pajama from memory. When they get a chance, she loves to spend quality time with her hubby of over twelve years and take naps on the couch while watching HGTV (her choice) or Forged in Fire (his choice).

Social Media Links:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/people/PM-Black/100071723620299

Instagram: www.instagram.com/pmblack.author

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Author Interview: ‘Déjà Doomed’ by Edward M. Lerner

About the Book:

On the Moon’s far side, shielded from Earth’s radio cacophony, Americans are building a radio-astronomy observatory. Russians sift the dust of a lunar “sea” for helium-3 to run future fusion reactors. Commercial robots, remotely operated from Earth, roam the Moon’s near side in a hunt for mineral wealth. Why chase distant asteroids for precious metals? Onetime asteroids must lie close beneath the much-bombarded lunar surface.

Then a prospecting robot encounters a desiccated, spacesuited figure. An alien figure ….

Americans from the lunar observatory investigate. Near the original find, underground, they discover an alien installation. Lunar Russians, realizing that the Americans are up to something clandestine, send their own small team. Each group distrusts the other … even before the fatal “accidents” begin. By the time anyone suspects what ancient evil they have awakened, it may be too late―

For everyone on Earth, too.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

By training, I’m a physicist and computer engineer. I worked in high tech and aerospace for thirty years, for much of that period — when time permitted — writing science fiction as a hobby. In 2004, after selling my second novel — meaning the first wasn’t a fluke – I began writing full-time. 

But why did I start writing? I’d apparently been complaining more than usual about what I’d been reading, and my wife said something along the lines of I suppose you can do better. So really, I had no choice but to try.  

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

A place, yes: my well configured, however cluttered, home office. No preferred time apart from never early in the morning.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

More or less everywhere. Things I’ve read, both fiction and non. Things in the zeitgeist, digital and otherwise. Things people say, without intending to influence, much less to initiate, future story scribbling. Catchy turns of phrase that, often with years-long persistence, haunt me before finding release in some story. Vacation stops. Family history. Basically, being receptive to the myriad myriads of stimuli all around. 

Yet more briefly: no writer is ever entirely off-duty.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

The extent of the plan varies with the story, but I always know where a story is going. That’s not to say the plan never changes. Because the outline works for me, not the other way around. And also because characters will have things to say ….

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I write science fiction, technothrillers, and popular science. Why? Because, first things first, I’m into science. Science is the best method we humans have found for understanding the world, improving our physical circumstances, and recovering from our own missteps. Science fiction just adds to that. SF not only entertains, it can — and often has — inspired people to become scientists and engineers. Me, for one.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

To answer that, first I have to say something about the book. It’s a near-future adventure set mostly on the Moon. Our intrepid explorers find artifacts left by ancient alien visitors — and you just know nothing good can come of poking around in those. Even if the novel’s title weren’t Déjà Doomed.

For Marcus, the American engineer hero, the clear choice is Matt Damon. I mean, look how well Damon handled a similar role in The Martian. For Marcus’s foil, Yevgeny, the Russian spy whose cover is lunar bush pilot, I’d go with Sergey Puskepalis, aka the engineer Zaytsev in the submarine/caper movie Black Sea. And as Valerie, Marcus’s brilliant astronomer wife — not one to let being stuck on Earth get in the way of insinuating herself into the off-world action – Amy Adams, who did such an exceptional job playing the brilliant exo-linguist in the SF movie Arrival.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

It’s a rare day I don’t read, whether science fiction or other fiction, science or history. I often have two or more books in progress.

Among the more classic SF authors, many of the usual suspects. Heinlein. Niven. Laumer. McDevitt. Brin. Turtledove. Among younger authors, Rob Sawyer, Ted Chiang, and Andy Weir. Outside the genre, Arthur Conan Doyle, Dashiell Hammett, Kurt Vonnegut, Robert Harris, Jack Higgins. Many popular-science and popular-history authors. And my apologies to everyone slipping my mind at the moment.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

In genre, a bit of a retrospective: The Collected Stories of Arthur C. Clarke. Out of genre, a biology book, Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters

9: What is your favourite book and why?

One favorite? It’s not possible to pick one. Not even close.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

Those would be my website, edwardmlerner.com, and my blog, blog.edwardmlerner.com. Also, shockingly enough, on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Amazon, always as Edward M. Lerner. In all cases, that’s spelled L-e-r-n-e-r.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/EdwardMLerner

Amazon page: www.amazon.co.uk/Edward-M-Lerner/e/B001IGSZLQ

About the Author:

EDWARD M. LERNER worked in high tech and aerospace for thirty years, as everything from engineer to senior vice president, for much of that time writing science fiction as his hobby. Since 2004 he has written full-time. 

His novels range from near-future technothrillers, like Small Miracles and Energized, to futuristic mysteries, like The Company Man, to such traditional SF-adventure fare as Dark Secret and his InterstellarNet series. Collaborating with Larry Niven, Lerner also wrote the space-opera epic Fleet of Worlds series of Ringworld companion novels. His 2015 novel, InterstellarNet: Enigma, won the inaugural Canopus Award “honoring excellence in interstellar writing.” His fiction has also been nominated for Locus, Prometheus, and Hugo awards. 

In shorter forms, Lerner’s writing has appeared in anthologies, collections, and many of the usual SF magazines and websites. He also writes about science and technology, most notably including Trope ing the Light Fantastic: The Science Behind the Fiction.

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Author Interview: ‘Grandest Revelation’ by Anubhav Anand

About the Book:

Astrophysics Professor Arthur Kane Davis survived a mysterious war, way before the Prehistoric era, only to brew plans in the present era to face the upcoming war once again. 

At the same time, Shawn Hammer, Grisha Hathaway, and Ravin Bhan encountered their respective hardships in different locations, just to unite together at a certain point where their paths were deemed to be crossed together. This convergence that they thought was a coincidence didn’t turn out to be so.

The trio learnt several theories and notions about their specialty that they thought didn’t exist or had no check with the reality. With the indulgence of Davis and other folks of their kind, the mystery began to unfold when they realized how large the picture was—they were the immediate descendants of the stars!

Imagine, if the stars would have life, then so they would have immense powers—the powers that have kept them alive for aeons; the powers that sometimes destroyed extraterrestrials and created chaos in the universe, because the universe was divided between good and evil stars.

But then…did the descendants know everything? Have they entirely understood the notions and the origin of their specialties and powers? Would they be able to adjust, or fate would be revamped upon some anomalies? And lastly…was it just about saving the universe from the evil stars or some conspiracy lied within the structure?

In order to seek these answers, they’ll have to encounter multiple revelations…only to embrace the grandest revelation of all time.

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Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

There was a part of me that always created stories since my childhood. I never got them into writing—well, it was just a bunch of straight and simple plots. I started writing when I was ten-year-old. I wrote something of two hundred pages on my desktop, which I thought was a scrap—and I lost that anyway since the hard drive crashed. Then, I wrote something of similar pages on notebooks, which again, got lost somewhere. At that time, I did realize from my writing that it wasn’t perfect. Perfect in terms of language and story-making. I thought to wait for the right time! And then, I began writing poems and short stories when I touched eighteen. 

I came across this plot five years ago whilst I was traveling on the train, accompanied by my own thoughts. I always knew that there’ll come a time when I’ll have to write something. Something critical! Something big! I was just waiting for myself to be ready for it. The ideas in the train came to me when I was looking at the stars in a very casual way. And really, little did I know how I can manipulate vast theories on the stars in a fictional and fantasy way. That was it! An overview of the plot was created. The rest just figured out eventually when I acted on it.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Well, my thoughts prevail at night, just because the night has a sense of peace in it. I can go on from midnight to the morning, sometimes nonstop if the plot that I’ve been writing has a flow in it. I’ve my work table where I usually write, then again sometimes my bed has some involvement too.

Adding to it, I try to write whenever I travel, even on flights as well. It has limitations though, but the change in place can explode your thoughts only for a short term, according to me!

3: Where do your ideas come from?

If I talk about the poems and short stories that I wrote in past, it came from my mere observance of the tiny details where I just cultivate it according to my interest and needs to write on it.

I’ve always appreciated the ideas and stories of all the writers, be it authors or editors, or scriptwriters. I’ve read various novels across multiple genres and watched content in terms of TV shows and movies to evaluate my brain and capture the mesmerizing stories. My book might have some instances where one might relate it to some shows or movies, and it was all necessary when I was writing my book. Nevertheless, the essence of it is all based on my observance. The observance of nature, the world, and the universe!  

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

This is really a very brilliant question! You see, I created the overall plot in my mind way before I began writing. But the plot was just an overview of the story, where it just simplifies how the beginning and the end of the story along with only a few major instances of it. But, once I began writing it, I started exploring the detailed instances, which I might not have planned in my head. I just go with the flow, where I put the details and make justifications for it.

There also have been cases where I’ve planned something else for some characters or any instance in the story and changed it at the last moment or at the time when I was writing it in detail. This usually happens because, at that very moment, I tend to write whatever is the best for that character or the plot.

And lastly, there have also been some occurrences where I add some additional details or instances, which strike to me at the time when I was in the flow with the story. Well, this unplanned event happens because I’ve to give justice to the planned section of the story, and these additional details would just act as the catalyst to it. 

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

Grandest Revelation: The Exordium revolves around the science fiction genre inclusive of fantasy. But the best part is that I never thought I would be writing in this genre. I read and like fantasy, mystery, crime, and thriller books, and I always envisioned writing on these said genres. But the thing about Grandest Revelation was such that the outline of the story automatically succumbed to science fiction.

Then again, this book will have some instances of other genres as well such as suspense, thriller, and a little bit of mystery and romance.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

This is difficult. Hah! Okay! Well, my book has several characters so putting them all in to cast would be a bulky task. Let’s narrow down some main characters though. I guess Morgan Freeman could be an appropriate cast for Arthur Kane Davis. For Grisha Hathaway, it’s a tough call, but I think it can be narrowed down to Sarah Grey or Anya Taylor-Joy. Having said that, the character Grisha is quite complicated and has some origin of British in her, so a new cast might appreciate this role in a captivating way. Ayden Mekus might capture the essence of Shawn Hammer, then again a new cast could also make his way to it. Ravin Bhan has Indian origin, so Siddhant Chaturvedi or Gagan Arora might be a decent cast for it, given that their age resembles as well with the character. It would be great if Daniel Radcliffe can portray Mark Jones, then again, Thomas Brodie-Sangster would also be a good choice. I’m way confused about the character Ethan Brown, so let’s bring a new cast for him.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

As back as I could go, I guess my interest in reading evolved from Enid Blyton’s books, mainly The Famous Five series, at the time of school. Carolyn Keene’s Nancy Drew attracted my interest as well. Down the line and I read the Harry Potter series, and it’s no mystery that Joanne Rowling became my favourite author of all time. I also have an affinity towards Dan Brown’s books, and I’ve read all of them. Recently, Stieg Larsson’s books made their existence into my shelves and I really appreciate the mystery-thriller genre in his books. On a similar level, some of Sidney Sheldon’s works raised my interest in crime thriller genres.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

It’s a shame that I’ve never gone through any of Agatha Christie’s books, which I always wanted to. Given my workload, I seldom get time to pursue my “reading novel” hobby. And so, presently I’ve picked up “And then there were none” to satisfy it. I’ve also lined up a couple of more books because murder mystery is one of my favourite genres and I admire this genre a lot. Well, let’s see where it would take me after this.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Well, for this question I would definitely go with the Harry Potter series. I’m keeping it basic! The reason being is that the level of imagination that the author has done in those books is something, which is beyond breath-taking. And why not, I mean the story indeed showed its presence to an overwhelming audience because of its mesmerizing content.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

I would just say them to write based on their experience and imagination—the content will automatically become stunning. Keep your ideas noted down at the precise moment when it comes to your mind. Sometimes, the thoughts are so grand that they would always be with you, but for other times, you need to jot it down, be it in your notepads, or your mobile phones. Always save your ideas in your email or google drives so that you may never lose them.

Finally…be observant! That’s the core way to become a writer in whatever genre you’re progressing. Read and watch as much content as you can—that’ll only make your mind evolve progressively.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

First, you can find me on my website: www.authoranubhavanand.com

I also update the blog on my website, mostly on monthly basis. Now, some of the social media sites, where I’m active are:-

Facebook author page:- www.facebook.com/authoranubhavanand

Instagram author page:- www.instagram.com/authoranubhavanand

Goodreads:- www.goodreads.com/author/show/21567944.Anubhav_Anand

LinkedIn:- www.linkedin.com/in/anubhavanand16

About the Author:

Coming from a town in Madhya Pradesh, India, where Anubhav Anand grew up and spent his childhood, had seen, observed, and experienced a lot to jot down some instances of drama, which might be relatable with many. Working in the corporate world now, he has consummated his post-graduation in marketing recently.

He has always believed that masterpieces are conjured by the combination of imagination and one’s own experience. This belief of his has allowed him to write several poems, mostly based on the philosophy of life and attitude. He also has a keen interest in reading novels and watching creative content that has opened his mind to new ideas in the aspect of creativity and art. Grandest Revelation: The Exordium is his first attempt to start on his writership as a novelist.

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Release Blitz: ‘The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray’ by O.R. Simmonds

The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray

Title: The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray

Author: O.R. Simmonds

Publisher: Appellation Press

Genre: Science Fiction, Time Travel Thriller

 

About the Book:

1980s LONDON. A SENSELESS MURDER, A BIZARRE DISAPPEARANCE AND A MYSTERY DECADES IN THE MAKING.

William Wells, a gifted but risk-averse US college dropout living an unadventurous life in London, stumbles upon a mysterious timepiece with the ability to alter time. When the Timepiece’s previous owner is brutally murdered by unknown assailants, Will flees, only to see his girlfriend, Abigayle, vanish before his eyes when she comes into contact with this remarkable watch.

He now finds himself alone in an unfamiliar city, wanted for a murder he didn’t commit and the prime suspect in a woman’s disappearance. Whether he knows it or not, Will does have one advantage – control over the most powerful force in the universe: time. The only problem is that he has no idea how to wield it. Those that do, members of a secretive and long-forgotten organisation, are also on his trail and there are no lines they won’t cross to recover The Timepiece.

 

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The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray promo

Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

About the Author:

O.R. Simmonds

O.R. Simmonds is a Writer, Director and Artist working in the Games Industry and author of The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray.

Before working in the games industry, he spent nearly a decade dreaming up deep, detailed worlds with weaving narratives only for them to be ‘value engineered’ by clients. It was during this time that he decided he no longer wanted to be a frustrated writer and to try to be an actual writer instead.

He ran a successful Kickstarter campaign to help fund the publication of his first novel, The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray, which is now due for release in 2021. His second book is slated for release sometime in 2022.

Ollie lives in Surrey, UK with his wife and two young boys. His eldest son is named after Doc Emmett Brown and the youngest’s middle name is Adventure (yes, really). It’s not all that surprising that his debut is a time travel adventure then.

Social Media Links:

Author Website: www.orsimmonds.com
 
 
Twitter: @o_simmonds
 
 

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