Tag Archives: Science Fiction

Author Interview: ‘Control Freakz’ by Michael Evans

About the Book:

Alone. Abandoned. Threatened. Natalie has lost all hope for a better future. Everything she’s known and everyone she’s ever loved is gone, and it’s up to her to get her old life back. In Michael Evans’s first novel, Control Freakz, Natalie’s journey toward a better life begins.

When Protocol 00 is enacted, Natalie’s family is taken by the government, along with the families of her two best friends, Ethan and Hunter. With nothing to lose, and the threat of government hitmen kidnapping them at any moment, the three must battle to survive in a horrid, post-apocalyptic world run by President Ash and his invasive government. They want answers. And they’re willing to jeopardize everything in desperate pursuit.

Risking ruthless leaders, attempted mind control, and her very existence on the planet, Natalie, along with Hunter and Ethan, will stop at nothing in their quest to regain everything they’ve ever known. Her spirits crushed and her will to live destroyed, Natalie knows everything is dead and gone, and soon she will be, too.

Memories connect us to the past, and can often cause us to long for a better future, but they can drive our minds into a state of hell if a better future is unattainable. Nevertheless, Natalie’s hope for a better a future remains.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

Well my name is Michael Evans, and I’m currently a sophomore in high school! I am extremely passionate about the future and have always loved to read! I can’t say there was a definitive moment when I got into writing, it was more of something I just did for fun since the moment I was able to read. Writing was the gift I was born with, and I have always had an innate desire to express my thoughts on the world around me. Most of the stuff I wrote about as a kid (well I guess I’m a kid now but I mean little kid) was innocent and frankly dumb. I once wrote a chapter book about a talking, flying, super baby, and wrote countless amounts of short stories that were spin-offs of novels I had already read (I literally wrote fanfic before I even knew what the word meant). I have also always loved writing poetry, and still do to this day. What started my adventure on writing novels, however, was my passion for nanotechnology, and the desire to raise awareness of the potential detrimental effects that it may have on society. My purpose was and will always be to help humanity work towards a better future for all.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I literally write whenever and wherever my schedule permits me (I have even been known to write in the car on the way to practices/events). However, most of the time I am able to write after school in the library for about an hour. And if I don’t write for at least an hour everyday… yeah it’s not good. It happens.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

That’s a great question that I don’t really know the answer to. My inspiration behind writing or the concept of an entire novel comes from things in life that I’m passionate about, and issues in society that I would love to raise awareness about. But the actual plot of a novel normally pops into my head randomly, and the dialogue of the characters and their emotions is something that I close my eyes and can hear in my head as I’m writing.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

It depends. I find that I know where the story is going to end up, but all the little ins and outs of how it’s going to get there is something that culminates in my mind as I’m writing, which is always exciting to see what happens!

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

Young Adult Dystopian is the current genre of my writings, but I will soon be branching out into Young Adult Contemporary novels. What initially drew me to Dystopian novels is the fact that they can convey a world in the near-future that has crumbled from the mishaps of humanity, and by portraying these apocalyptic worlds, I hope to urge those who read it from relentlessly attempting to prevent the mistakes that occured in my fictional society, from occuring in our real society. And of course I write for Young Adults, because I am a Young Adult myself, however as I grow and mature, I still feel that I will always write in the Young Adult genre, because Young Adult authors have the unique opportunity and privilege to impact a next generation of thinkers that writers who direct their work towards other audiences do not have.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Wow, another great question that I don’t quite have an answer to. This might be a bad thing but I rarely watch any movies or TV, I mainly stick to reading books, watching the news, and reading scientific articles. From the limited amount of movie stars I know off the top of my head, I can’t see anyone one person playing the in depth, emotional of the specific characters in my book.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I read a lot, but I would love to read even more if it weren’t for my voracious desire to write all the time! However my favorite authors all time are John Green, Stephen King, Veronica Roth, Rick Riordan, Alexandra Bracken, Scott Westerfeld, and of course J.K. Rowling.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

On Writing and A Bazaar of Bad Dreams both by Stephen King.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

I have so many books that I love that it’s hard for me to pick a favorite. However, the novel that has impacted me the most is Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. That was the first book that I felt encapsulated by the story, and it was the first novel that inspired me to create my own captivating stories, just like that one.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

First of all I commend you for having the desire to express yourself in such a raw and beautiful way! Now let me tell you me three writing pro tips:

  • Write about something you’re passionate about. Books are just like people! No one will love you more than you love yourself, and no one will love a book more than the person who created it.
  • Write everyday. I know this is tough, but if you really want to be a writer you have to be decided to hone your craft every day of your life. Writing isn’t a job, it isn’t a hobby, and it certainly isn’t homework, writing is a lifestyle. Embrace it.
  • Write the first thing that comes to your mind. Your first thought is always the most original expressive. If it comes out sounding weird or even discursive, that’s what edits are for!

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

Feel free to connect with me on any of my pages!

Instagram: www.instagram.com/mevansinked

Facebook: www.facebook.com/MEvansInked

Twitter: @MEvansInked

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/17306697.Michael_Evans

Link to website: www.mevansinked.com

About the Author:

Author Michael Evans lives in Charleston, SC, but is originally from Long Island, NY. He has always enjoyed writing, but his other loves include being in nature, and learning about science and technology–and he is fascinated with the future.

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Author Interview: ‘The Stranger in 0-G’ by Kate K. Bassett

About the Book:

Pena settles for what is instead of what could be.

Pena Chado is a victim of circumstance. Elevated from rural poverty to power and freedom, she’s learned to stay silent when her soul screams and push her dreams aside for the bigger picture of duty.

Despite her loveless marriage, Pena remains loyal to her charismatic, alcoholic husband while shouldering the role of unwilling mother to an aloof child that terrifies her.

The scorching winds that bleach the bones of her desire ease when she is tasked with a delivery to a handsome, mysterious stranger; one that longs to consume the woman she is, not the one her responsibilities need her to be.

Trussed in ribbons and suspended zero gravity, her emerald haired seducer offers no name and asks for nothing in return except the passion she’s never known.

***

The Stranger in 0-G is a free sci-fi erotica novella in the world of the upcoming Timewalker Saga series.

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

 

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

Man, well…I used to work in Hollywood as a Post Production Producer and in corporate America as a PM for nearly twenty years. Literature was always my passion; I always wrote small stories since I was a kid and dreamed of writing for comics, video games and sci-fi shows but I was never encouraged to do so. Sadly, like many others…I ignored my desires and got a job.

What brought me back to writing was being stuck in an elevator. No joke.  I hated my gig and didn’t get paid for the stress I endured. Early one morning, a coworker and I took the elevator to our suite and it screeched to a halt on the third floor. We dangled there, crouching on the floor to avoid the acrid smoke pouring in above us, for two hours until the fire department rescued us with the jaws of life. I promised myself that if I ever got out of that situation alive, I would never work an office job again and follow my passion for writing. That was two years ago.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I’m an early morning person, so I get up at 6:30 am every day, do the daily eating, brushing and green tea and write at my dining room table until 2 pm. I’m creative when I wake up and I like my late afternoons and evenings to be free so I can train Brazilian jiu jitsu, read and play video games.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

I’ve been having this very detailed, operatic science fiction Time Walker Saga world in my head since I was 14, so I’m hammering it out on paper as I go. My sporadic ideas just come willy-nilly. Maybe it’s a conversation I have, or something I’ve read or just a person I see on the street that interests me. What is consistent is I always ask the question: ‘What if X was different somehow? How would that go‘?

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I’m a religious user of the Snowflake Method. I wouldn’t recommend it for everyone, but since I worked in technology for so long, I think like a coder when it comes to plot and pace. What I do ad lib is dialogue. If there is one thing I love the most, its writing dialogue off the cuff. Its fun and the voices give some interesting wiggle room to what will happen next.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I write whatever I like. I might write a snarky novella one second or an erotic novel the next. My passion is science fiction, super hero lore and cyberpunk. I love imagining a rich world that is experimental and primal in its technological manipulations. Androids and dark web excite me and deep space allure me. My late father and I used to watch lots of Star Trek, The Twilight Zone and the Stephen King television series.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Man… When it comes to The Stranger in 0-G, I’d love to see Benedict Cumberbatch to play Creffo, Viola Davis to play Pena, Rick Fox to play Hosea and Jack Black to play the Opera House Manager.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I always have a book in my hand, but my favorite authors are Frank Miller, Brian Michael Bendis, Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Neal Stephenson, Harlan Ellison, Isaac Asimov, Patricia Highsmith, Phillip K. Dick and Margaret Atwood. Ursula Le Guin, too.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

I’m reading Communion by Whitley Strieber, the first contact alien book. I know people are scared by it, but when it got to the alien probe/butt stuff…I couldn’t help but to giggle.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Whispers by Dean Koontz, hands down. To this day I never saw the twist coming and every time I read it, something new always rears its ugly head.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Just write. Even if it’s bad, write. Ignore what people say about its competitive; everything is competitive. Just write, edit, publish and move on. Learn how to read out loud to catch your mistakes and find a good person to be your editor. The magic is in the edits, not the first draft. Also, don’t market your books…gift your books. If you really love what you’re doing and you think it would benefit someone else, talk about it. Show your enthusiasm. You have a talent and people will be swayed if you genuinely love what you’re doing.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

You can find me everywhere:

Website: www.kanobassett.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/Kate-K-Bassett

Instagram: www.instagram.com/katekanobassett

Twitter: @KateKBassett

Google +: www.plus.google.com/106088484413283741722

Tumblr: www.kanobassett.tumblr.com

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/14429541.Kano_Bassett

Amazon: www.amazon.com/-/e/B016CUZSKI

But if you want some up to date snippets, I am very active on Quora.

Thanks for having me! This was completely fun!

About the Author:

Love Stories? Join the mailing list! http://bit.ly/2yaIcb9

Kate K. Bassett was a former Senior project manager who worked for Microsoft, Electronic Arts, Fox, Turner Television and God Knows Who Else in her twenty year career.

Her last project drove her so bonkers that she quit her white collar job and became a dirty, dirty creative. Health and sanity was WAYYY more than a paycheck. She’s not bitter. She really isn’t.

She codes mobile phone games and writes horrible erotica ebooks depending on the mood she’s in. Kate is an avid gamer who loves Street Fighter 5 and anything Shin Megami Tensei Before Persona 4. Kate’s a snob.

She dreams of having coffee with Brian Micheal Bendis and ask what was he smoking when he wrote Sam & Twitch: Udaku. She wants to talk to Frank Miller, too but he’s too important.

Currently, she lives in Seattle, WA with her two cats and some dude who puts up with her. For stress relief, she practices jiu jitsu. OSSSS!

And yes…it’s pronounced like Kano from Mortal Kombat.

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Author Interview: ‘The Wealth of a Nation’ by T.B. O’Neill

About the Book:

This dystopian tale takes place when the jobs are gone — that is, except for an elite class of Workers. The story opens as Nathan Englander’s grandfather is jailed, and Nathan defends him in court. He soon begins to make connections about his grandfather’s past, while just down the street from his office, the city of Bakerton is building a Border Wall to separate Worker enclaves from Citizens. Protest is inevitable. The violence unexpected.

Thrust into the spotlight for his heroism at the Border Wall, Nathan prefers to keep his distance from the politicians, but is already on a trajectory to challenge political corruption and the shadow government exercising extra-constitutional power. He soon learns of an imminent terrorist attack, and may be able to prevent it, but not without placing those he loves in jeopardy. The culprits come from within. But from which side of the Border?

Awakening to the restrictive order of his city and nation, Nathan must nimbly negotiate between two power states, try to mend his city, and save those he loves. And he must face a larger question: In a place and time where the dependents of society are convinced that they are “privileged,” and the right to work or engage in commerce is severely constrained, here does one find dignity? And is anyone really free?

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I’m 71. Always longed to write fiction. But as a practicing lawyer, I was writing constantly at work and had little energy for the avocation until I retired and started writing about 6 years ago.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

I habitually go to the word processor each morning (between 6 and 7), after my coffee and email duty, and write for the next four to six hours. I have a study where I do my dirty work.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

I came from a working class family. The inception for the idea of this book came as I was sitting on the porch one evening, contemplating how technology, robotization, globalizing the work force (out of this country) and immigration, have each contributed, to ever diminishing employment opportunities for people who work with their hands. Most people in fact. I witnessed what happened to the lumber industry in the Northwest, and the garment industry in the east. Then I asked myself, what will happen when the jobs are gone? When only those with smarts and specialized educations can get decent pay; when tradesmen must compete with failed baccalaureates; and when speaking the King ’s English is required for even service jobs? What will happen to economic mobility? How will the government keep the peace, keep the rabble from rioting. Pay for it all? I sat down the next day and started to write, not knowing where it would take me.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I didn’t with the first four books I’ve written, although I am currently mapping out an outline for the prequel to this book, The Wealth of a Nation. The prequel will be entitled The Fall of a Nation, and the series will end with a sequel, The Rise of a Nation.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I’ve written two memoirs, one legal thriller, and this book, which reads like a thriller, but meets the criteria for classical dystopian fiction.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Can’t say.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I’ve always read a lot, although, personally I’m slow and careful as I read. For modern writers I love Cormac McCarthy best, but also John Irving and Pat Conway. More recently Hannah’s Nightingale, and especially Anthony Doerr’s All The Light We Cannot See, whose book set my mind ablaze. So I guess you’d say I like rhythmic writers, those who feel the language as they tell their story.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

We, the Russian classic; and The Handmaids Tale. Just finished Homo Deus, Ordinary Grace by William Krueger, and Fleet, by Brian Marshal.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Blood Meridian, by Cormac McCarthy. It is the great American Novel. The flow, the rhythm, the mood, like a symphony. A total immersion of sound and images and story that melt into a whole gut churning and mind emblazing experience.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

You can say you are a writer when: you do it steadily, love it more than a child, and have put in your 10,000 hours learning the craft.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?  

I’m working on this; no answer to date.

 

About the Author:

I admit I spent three decades practicing law.

But I would have rather been a writer. Trial work did allow me to fight the old battles of my youth (primarily against authority of any kind), and it provided a treasure trove of material that writers search for tirelessly. Courtroom work, if you do it right, is essentially story telling. Not just any story. It must ring true because In court emotions are tense, senses are acute. The result can be comic in its absurdity, or sad enough to make you weep. The stories juries hear can be full of hubris and defensive pride, or fearful, shy and pleading. Either way, they all churn your gut. And your adversaries at the bar can be insidiously cunning, though skilled in the art of deception. As often as not, the truth is hard to find. But these were my peers, my fellow lawyers, and sometimes me, who later came to populate my fiction.

So, it is not surprising that I use the law as a backdrop for my novels, and lawyers as characters to explore story lines where justice and the moral consequences of its execution are major themes. The protagonists in The Wealth of a Nation and Slugger are lawyers, and I require them to make hard choices. Whether in life or in fiction, one must be careful not to align oneself with the wrong faction.

I began this second career as a writer by accident, although in earnest, when my brother asked that I chronicle our family history. The result was a two-volume saga: A Mile Beyond, and Dangle Him Purposely. Each is a tale about my family. The first volume explores a family wracked by violence, alcoholism, ignorance, and chronic poverty. The second volume, taking place in the ’60s, concentrates on my generation’s loss of innocence during the Vietnam era, and my memory of the war. Both memoirs are essentially stories of well-earned guilt and redemption.

Now that gray is the predominant color of my hair and skin, and I’ve been able to see more clearly the follies of my past, I hope to impart the lessons of my youth. One upside is that reliving your past will scrub your soul clean, although it will never shine like it did in your youth.

For those who are curious: I love this avocation . . . writing. Getting up before dawn and discovering what is revealed on the blank page. I live with my wife, Beth, and my three-legged dog, Joe, in a Northern California walnut orchard with a view of the mountains. And I dream that someday my grandchildren will read the history of their family in my memoirs, and be strengthened by the mettle and resilience of their ancestors.

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Author Interview: ‘Afterdeath’ by Benoit Chartier

About the Book:

Death is a country we see through the tiny keyhole of an immovable door. Raised by their grandmother after their parents’ death, Chloe and Olivia Borders are now in mourning for Rose. The Alzheimer’s that forced them to be split into separate foster homes has taken their last living family member. As a way to rekindle their friendship, the twins commit to a road trip— which spells their demise. Now the question is: What comes after, and how will they get back to life?

 

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

I’m a French Canadian who shares his time between his home country and Japan, where my wife is from. I have two kids, one born there and one born here. I got into writing very young, when an author came to our school and it finally clicked that all the books in the library came from somewhere.  That week I wrote my first book. It was thirty pages long. I still have it.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Morning, at my computer in our room, when there’s no one in the house. I’ll drink green tea and plug away at the computer for four or five hours. I’m getting ready to leave for Japan again, so I’ll probably work on my new novel over there for a spell.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

Out of the blue, mostly. They’re an amalgamation of everything I think about, and the new stimuli that comes knocking on my brain, out of nowhere. I once got the idea for the currency in the land of the dead from kids playing with pennies at a table a the restaurant.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I usually know the ending before I start the long slog. I changes sometimes, but I have a fairly solid stick in the sand to aim for.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

I like to write cyberpunk, fantasy and paranormal (for now). I was heavily into fantasy as a kid (Piers Anthony, Tad Williams, Robert Asprin). My father was more of a sci-fi nerd, so I started picking up his books from his shelf. A lot of Isaac Asimov, if I remember correctly. Then I got into more newish stuff, Orson Scott Card, Isaac Asimov, Jeff Noon. I really like weird fiction at the moment, and my favorite publishing house is out of Toronto: Chizine Publications. I’ve found everything they publish is gold.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

In my latest, I would love to see up-and-coming young black actresses playing the twins. Maybe Fallon and Felisha King?  I can easily picture Morgan Freeman playing Toussaint, Idris Elba playing the Baron Dimanche, Sigourney Weaver as Larunda and Emma Watson as Angelina. Yeah. That would kick ass.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

I try to read as much as possible. Right now, my favorite authors are my friends who are breaking through in the writing world. People like Meghan Negrijn and Craig Munro. They’re the best. Otherwise, I very much enjoy William Gibson, Robert Shearman, Helen Marshall and Neil Gaiman.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

The Bones of the Past, by Craig Munro

9: What is your favourite book and why?

Sure, make me pick my favorite child. Okay, let me tell you about my favorite-book-as-artifact. It’s called “S.”. It is the most wonderful thing I’ve ever encountered in the literary world. Let me tell you about it. It comes in a box, so you can’t see what it looks like. It was written as a collaboration between J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst. When I got it, I had no idea what I was getting into. I asked for it for Christmas. So I open the box, and inside, is a book that looks like it was printed in the 1950s. The book itself is an artifact. It’s made to look as if it’s a library book that’s been borrowed for years. There are stamps at the back, it has the Dewey Decimal sticker on the spine; the whole nine yards. The book itself says that it is called “The Ship of Theseus”, written by V.M. Straka. Inside the book, you will find, written in the margins, conversations between two people, for the duration of the book. Back and forth, back and forth, written in different penmanship and color, (making it easier to identify the writers). These two are a man and a woman who go to the same College. The man was kicked out, and sneaks back in sometimes to study the book. The woman is a student trying to figure out her life, who also likes Straka (as an author). Now, there is a mystery surrounding this book, and who the author is. The “original” story was written in German, and so there is a translator who leaves footnotes. The two readers discover more and more about the book, and a very present danger by secret societies still extant, and must figure out together what’s going on. Throughout the book itself, which, on its own, is beautifully written, there are clues. The translator points to them, and eventually the reader must figure them out him or herself. As well, the two leave each other little odds and ends inside the book (pictures, postcards, napkins with hidden messages, little newspaper clippings, obituaries, etc.), which add to the authenticity of the thing. You’ll never find this book in a library, just because of the bits of memorabilia that will get lost. It is the most wonderful little jewel, and the most complicated, that I’ve ever had the pleasure of wrapping my head around.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Read a lot, write until the thing is finished. Take the criticism. Improve. Learn. You’ll make it.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

Website: www.trode.ca

Facebook: www.facebook.com/calumnist

Twitter: @chartier_benoit

YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCfopDTGimofA7OAXoyu69zA

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/7030391.Benoit_Chartier

 

About the Author:

Benoit Chartier is a Science Fiction, Fantasy and Paranormal author who also does a podcast called Adventure In Your Ear and writes a philosophy blog. He lives in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada with his wife and two sons. He shares his time between Canada and Japan.

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Author Interview: ‘Jet Set Jeff: The Science Defender’ by Kenneth Harris

About the Book:

The City of Springdale is facing rising crime due to an economic setback. There are not enough first responders to help those in need or each other.

This is why 10-year old Jeff Morgan secretly creates a malfunctioning gadget suit to protect his mother, a police officer, and his father, a firefighter from the menace scientist Glue Dude and his squad of misfits seeking to terrorize the city. Can Jeff handle his defected suit in not only saving his parents but also stopping his nemesis Glue Dude from activating a secret weapon intended to destroy humanity?

In this humorous action-adventure chapter-book containing vivid illustrations, each chapter has an interesting stand alone story leading eventually to the final climax where Jeff not only learns of his true purpose but also must make a big decision he never expected in the never-ending battle against crime.

Jeff’s efforts in the struggle to use his gadgets to succeed is aligned to how anyone with positive values can eventually triumph over obstacles. This book is an ideal for children. Life is a rollar coaster ride. With determination and persistence, dreams can be fulfilled.

Jet Set Jeff: The Science Defender relates to children as heroes and the journey to make a difference in the lives of others during tough times.

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Purchase Links:

Amazon – UK / US

Author Interview:

1: Tell us a little about yourself and what got you in to writing?

My nourishment for literacy started as far back when I was 7 years old when the topic of comic book superheroes dominated my discussions with my three brothers. My father was a big Superman fan since he was a child and enjoyed reading comic books as a pastime like many baby boomers of his time. I guess it’s fair to say he passed on his likings of superheroes to his sons. Every Saturday, my brothers and I used our allowance money to go to the comic book store to purchase magazines of our favourite superheroes. Throughout a decade, we all probably owned a total of over a thousand comic books. This art is what propelled me to read. Reading eventually resulted in my desire to write my own stories of superheroes.

2: Do you have a favourite time and place where you write?

Currently, I am fortunate to work a split shift during the day for a health and human services agency. This gap of a few hours between provides me room to indulge in creative writing. I find no better setting than this period to work in my home office where I am afforded an opportunity to be an innovator in the thought process of drafting a story.

3: Where do your ideas come from?

The roots of some of my ideas grow from dreams. For example, few of them consisted of me flying over a country landscape. I assumed I was some type of superhero with loose screws and bolts raining down from my weird suit. I remember having this dream as a child and occasionally it returned during adulthood. It gave me the idea for my recent children’s chapter book, “Jet Set Jeff: The Science Defender.” Other times, ideas materialize from hearing people in conversation. A simple word or express of feelings in the workplace or at the store can trigger an idea for a potential story.

4: Do you have a plan in your head of where the story is going before you start writing or do you let it carry you along as you go?

I am a plotter. What that means is I have to know exactly where my story is going before I start the manuscript. I develop the characters with people I know personally or real-life actors. Afterwards, I develop 3 acts. The beginning, middle, and end. Separate obstacles for the protagonist fill those acts. I must know the ending in detail. All of this is the skeleton of my story. On a separate word file, I proceed with the verbal exchanges of the characters. After all is said and done, I go through this procedure again and again until the story structure satisfies me. Of course, some elements of this are deleted and new ideas enter the picture. It’s a long but fulfilling process that better prepares me for the writing journey when I began the actual manuscript.

5: What genre are your books and what drew you to that genre?

My books are primarily for children with the emphasis of superheroes and action-adventure. I find such genres a great way to draw children into reading. The comic book formula is upon the education publishing market. Today, respectable industries like ABDO publishing has many titles featuring Spiderman, Iron Man, the Avengers, and so much more. When I was a kid, I don’t recall having access to these types of educational supplements. In my youth, I actually thought this was unfair considering America’s love affair with comic books. It was widely accepted during the Great Depression and World War 2. Now the availability of these superhero titles in the educational market propelled me to indulge in my own quest in writing and publishing my own heroes for this area.

6: What dream cast would you like to see playing the characters in your latest book?

Anyone who reads my book, “Jet Set Jeff: The Science Defender” and saw reruns of the sitcom Family Matters, would immediately see comparisons with the Steve Urkel character as Jeff Morgan. I made Jeff slightly more mature. Family Matters had a fine cast of characters. If a movie was being developed based on Jet Set Jeff, and I had a role in casting, I probably would look to cast Jeff parents like the ones on the show. I found the actors strong, funny, and symbolic of the American dream.

7: Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors?

Aside from studying the history of comics, I read a lot of fiction. As a teen, I enjoyed Walter Mosely’s Ezekiel Rawls mysteries. “Devil in a Blue Dress” stands out as a story that keeps the reader in suspense until the final chapter.

8: What book/s are you reading at present?

Right now I am immersing in Maurice Horn’s “The World Encyclopedia of Comics”. This book is nearly a thousand pages and just as old as me and I can’t put it down. It’s full of comic history. I like comic history. It won’t be easy to put it down anytime soon.

9: What is your favourite book and why?

As I can’t seem to put down Maurice Horn’s “The World Encyclopedia of Comics” I guess for now this is my favourite book until something better comes along.

10: What advice would you give for someone thinking about becoming a writer?

Write what you are passionate about.

11: What are the best Social Media Sites for people to find out about you and your work?

I like to connect with my fans and talk with them about comics! I like to engage a big group of people on the subject of comic books and how it shaped and molded our existence in the literary world. Please visit my website at kforpartnership.wixsite.com/educ and let’s engage in educating each other on this wonderful art form. You can also learn more about me on my Amazon author platform at www.amazon.com/author/harriskenneth.

About the Author:

As contributing writer of a news magazine and a writer of action-adventure children chapter books featuring heroes, I have had a life long passion for the history of comic strips, comic book superheroes, and their creators.

As a substitute teacher, elementary school paraprofessional, and preschool teacher, I realized some educational markets like ABDO publishing, created supplements about super-heroes and made them available for elementary schools. Spider-Man. The Hulk. Captain America. The Avengers. So many of these figures are accepted and used as a tool for a theme or lesson in the classroom.

Naturally, since I have had a strong interest in comic books and the creation of it all, I felt I had a duty to not only write about my own hero creations, but also to develop a platform for others who have a passion for the history of comic strips and their creators. It’s a fascinating subject and I learn something new each time I study the topic.

Adults will never get tired of comics and graphic novels. There always have been a great appreciation for this art form.

That’s why I decided to create a new monthly newsletter titled, “Superhero Sandwich.” This is a great way to share some facts about the golden age of comics and to invite readers to share their thoughts, knowledge, or opinions.

Aside from that, the themes in my fiction and nonfiction action-adventure books can go along with the lessons children learn in school or summer camps and help mold cognitive development; especially in the field of English language arts.

My mission is to get the message out there about comic heroes and their creators and use their stories to share and reflect during a time when comics were falsely considered only, “kids stuff.” I like to connect with readers who have this passion for comics and the hard-working people behind the scenes who made it all work.

Check out my website at kforpartnership.wixsite.com/educ and subscribe to my FREE monthly newsletter. Let us talk about the history of comics. We can learn somethings from each other. Check out a podcast of my storytelling technique from a public competition at www.tinyurl.com/kluxvjm. I’m sure you will enjoy it!

Electrifying the appetite for comic history!

Email: kforpartnership@gmail.com

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